The Cultural Gutter

building a better robot builder

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

The Love Blackmailer

Robin Bougie
Posted July 27, 2006

Meet Ted Leversuch, a Canadian smut peddler from the '60sA lot of trash cinema fans don’t realize that Canada has a long and sleazy history of sexploitation films. Until somewhat recently — despite being a Canadian citizen, as well as ‘60s filth-film booster, I didn’t either.


In a previous column, I introduced you to Quebecois smut king Claude Pierson, and his 1966 film WE ARE ALL NAKED. His career spanned 20 years, directing EROTIC LOVE GAMES (1971), NAKED LOVERS (1977), JUSTINE DE SADE (1972) and collaborating with eurotrash god Jess Franco on JUSTINE (1975).
Let me introduce you now to an even more obscure Canadian sexploitation filmmaker from north of the 49th parallel, and prove that even in the ‘60s, Canadians knew how to get freaky and sinful.
THE LOVE BLACKMAILER (1966)
aka Adulterous Affair
aka Room for a Stranger
84 min. Black and White.
Directed By Ted Leversuch
Starring Jean Christopher, Bruce Grey, Sean Sullivan, Brian Hadley James, Faith Gardener,
Drifter Russ Taren (Bruce Grey) makes a meager living blackmailing cheating wives, but he doesn’t just settle on cash for his trouble — he wants the ladies to pay him in naked sweaty flesh! Taren rents a $10-a-week room from Lola, a lonely ex-stripper who makes nightly visits to his room to drink rye, smoke cigarettes, and try to finagle Russ into the sack. Her good-looking and suave renter is polite, (“I bet you look like a million bucks with your war paint on!”) but eventually tires of her constant rutting and demands that she get bent so he can return to his “work”.
The real quarry is his latest victim Barbara (Jean Christopher), a lovely but neglected next door suburban Toronto housewife who has secretly taken up with a British fop named Steven who plies his trade as the family doctor. Russ gets his jollies taking saucy incriminating photos of them in the act, (none of his sexy subjects ever seem close their drapes!) and after Barbara and Stephen return from a clandestine Niagara Falls getaway, he approaches her with his best B-grade James Bond villain impersonation, and makes his contemptible demands known. loveBIG.jpg
Against her better judgement, Barbara allows herself to be taken on as his part time sex slave, but with her husband Frank, Dr. Stephen, as well as Russ all taking turns riding her, the frazzled housewife begins to feel like the town bicycle. Will Barbara continue to allow the sleazy blackmailer to take her for not only what she’s got in the bank, but in her panties as well? Or will she figure out a way to get her revenge? And look out gang… husband Frank is getting suspicious!
The elegant Miss Jean Christopher (who was actually quite a decent actress) started her screen career as one of the stars of the infamous CBC satire program NIGHTCAP, a bawdy late night hit hosted by Canuck entertainer Billy Van. She had only one other starring role in PLAYGIRL KILLER two years later.
This was the very first film in a long and fruitful career for Bruce Grey, who can been seen in Hollywood films like STARSHIP TROOPERS, and SPY HARD, but is best known in Canada for his TV role of Adam Cunningham on TRADERS which ran from ’96 to 2000.
Director Ted Leversuch arrived in Canada in the early 1960s from the UK, and quickly became one of the most daring characters in our still-fledgling film industry. His first move was to pen the 1963 nudist flick HAVE FIGURE WILL TRAVEL for future STARLOST director Leo Orenstein, and two years later, directing the nudie cutie FRENCH WITHOUT DRESSING. This was followed by a string of slightly nastier “adults only” melodramas he and his writing partner Margot Stevens would team up on, starting with THE LOVE BLACKMAILER, TAKE HER BY SURPRISE (as producer) and SEX AND THE LONELY WOMAN 1 and 2, each film progressively more kinky than the last.
In my mind, they did Canada proud.

Comments

2 Responses to “The Love Blackmailer”

  1. Violet
    July 31st, 2006 @ 7:30 pm

    Your article about Canada having alot of sleazy sexploitation films couldn’t be more true. Being from Canada I find this particualrly funny. I remember being 12 or so and staying up late to catch some of the “dirty” films on the french channel. I had never really thought about it before but I guess its just another thing that makes us Canuck perverts!!

  2. test
    August 24th, 2006 @ 8:50 pm

    test 13

Leave a Reply





  • Support The Gutter

  • The Book!

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Black Girl Nerds, Jamie Broadnax writes a powerful piece about racism, cosplaying, police violence and the homicide of Darrien Hunt. “The first thing we need to do is NOT let this story scare us nor intimidate us into believing that we should be fearful of cosplaying.  We should still encourage others who may not yet have participated in cosplay to know that there are several communities for people of color to have safe spaces where they can be embrace and be their nerdy selves. If there is little to no news about this incident on other mainstream geek sites that feature cosplayers, then framing this around race is pertinent and they should be called out on their silence.  Even IF this is not an incident where Darrien Hunt was actively cosplaying, the tone has already been set and anyone who is a part of the cosplay community should address this matter.  Many Black cosplayers are concerned about this, and still wonder if they would be viewed as ‘suspicious’ walking down the street.”

    ~

    Nerds of Color announces that their own David Walker will be writing Dynamite’s Shaft comic. Denys Cowan shares the cover for Shaft #1 drawn by Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz. Sanford Greene shares some his cover work here and here. Black Comix posts Ulises Farinas’ cover.  Comics Wow has more and previews covers. (Via Black Comix and World of Hurt)

    ~

    Actor Richard Kiel has died. Kiel worked in both film and television, including performances in The Twilight Zone episode, “To Serve Man”; Eegah (1962); The Barbary Coast with William Shatner; Happy Gilmore (1996); Pale Rider (1985); as Vlad in Tangled (201); and as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).   The New York TimesThe Los Angeles Times and Variety have obituaries. Here he is interviewed with Britt Ekland. And David Letterman interviews Kiel here.

    ~

    Open Culture has a round-up of eight free and complete films by Dziga Vertov, including Man With A Movie Camera (1929) and the first Soviet animated feature, Soviet Toys (1924). (Thanks, Earl!)

    ~

    Matt Zoller Seitz has written a lovely meditation on Robin Williams at RogerEbert.com: “Williams wore the invisible garments of depression. He carried that burden. A lot of the time we didn’t see it, because he was a bright and enthusiastic comic performer and a great actor. But the weight was always there.

    Somehow he lived 63 years.

    What a warrior he was.”

    ~

    At Kaiju Shakedown, Hiroshi Fukazawa interviews director Ringo Lam. “Not as flashy as John Woo, never as hyperkinetic as Tsui Hark, Ringo Lam is one of Hong Kong’s most underappreciated directors. He made his name with sophisticated, downbeat crime dramas that came to define a certain style of urban Hong Kong cinema in the Eighties and early Nineties. After getting his start in television at CTV and TVB, he directed five features before finding his stride with 1987’s City on Fire, the movie that provided the blueprint for Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs.”

    ~

  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.

    -------

  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: