The Cultural Gutter

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“Deadly Art of Survival”

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Posted May 17, 2014

The Gutter’s own Keith writes about No Wave, Black cinema, ninjas, kung fu, cultural sharing, cultural appropriation, music and New York in a piece on The Deadly Art of Survival for Teleport City. “Its curious place in the history of cinema, for instance, [is] as this weird amalgamation of no wave, black cinema, and martial arts cinema. Or the way it is ingrained into the fabric of New York City—Nathan Ingram is a real guy, after all, and he ran and still runs a kungfu school in Chinatown (one of the first and only black-run schools in Chinatown). He got a medal from Ed Koch for using his martial arts prowess to foil a robbery. With few opportunities as a young man, he fell in with street thugs and even ran with Nicky Louie and the infamous Chinatown gang the Ghost Shadows before he got his life together and decided to pay his karmic debts by teaching others to avoid the mistakes he made. You can walk down to 225 Park Row, and there is his school and there are his students, and there he is.”

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