The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Female Friendship and the Slenderman Stabbing

guttersnipe
Posted June 6, 2014

“[The Slenderman Stabbing] appears to echo patterns of behaviorbelief in culturally-supported fantasies, tightly-cathected bonds between young women, an intensity of connection that has occasionally led to violencethat have occurred repeatedly, in various forms, throughout history and around the world. And they happen outside the heterosexual framework we use to understand [Elliot] Rodgers’ misogynistic rampage. This crime is one that reminds us of the central role that homosocial bonding plays in the lives of the many young women who spend their adolescent years battling, and occasionally ‘seeing,’ their own demons. ” Read more here.

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