The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Looking Back on 25 Years of Star Trek: The Next Generation

guttersnipe
Posted October 10, 2012

“The Next Generation awakened in me a feeling of terrible and suffocating yearning — that hopeless childish escape wish that’s the wake of a certain kind of fantasy. That feeling that in a different world you’d be happy. I carefully recorded each episode on our VCR — I remember buying the VHS tapes, in cellophane-wrapped three-packs — and typed out labels on an enormous electric typewriter.” Brian Phillips writes about Star Trek: The Next Generation twenty-five years after its premiere. via James Schellenberg)

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