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RIP, Paul Mazursky

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Posted July 7, 2014

Writer, director, actor and producer Paul Mazursky has died. Mazursky directed Bob And Carol And Ted And Alice (1969), Harry And Tonto (1974),  An Unmarried Woman (1978), Moscow On The Hudson (1984), Down And Out In Beverly Hills (1986), Enemies, A Love Story (1989). Mazursky was Emmanuel Stoker in The Blackboard Jungle (1955), a tv interviewer in the pilot of  The Monkees, which he co-wrote, Norm in Curb Your Enthusiasm and Sunshine in The Sopranos.  Mazursky wrote most of his films. He also wrote the screenplay for, I Love You, Alice B. Toklas (1968).  The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and Variety have obituaries. Here Mazursky talks about Bob And Carol And Ted And Alice. Here’s a tribute to Mazursky from the 2010 Ventura Film Festival. And here Mazusky interviews Leonard Nimoy and Mel Brooks and Richard Donner on his internet show, It’s All Crap.

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One Response to “RIP, Paul Mazursky”

  1. Paul Mazursky dead: Five times Oscar-nominated director has died, aged 84Big Online News | Big Online News
    January 7th, 2015 @ 3:00 am

    […] Directed by Paul MazurskyA Paul Mazursky Newark Cameo/Visions of an Airport: Harry and Tonto (1974)RIP, Paul Mazursky : The Cultural GutterJuly Rambling: Weird Al, and the moon walkMother: Daughter’s Accident In Dollar General Store Led […]

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