The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Twilight of the Transformers

guttersnipe
Posted July 2, 2014

“It was the nightmarish, Nietzschean fulfillment of the summer-movie aesthetic, a movie that seemingly had eaten all of pop culture and vomited it back up again as shards of metal. One example: It featured the real Leonard Nimoy as a robot god and also a clip from a Star Trek episode and hidden snippets of sampled Nimoy dialogue from a Star Trek movie. It was an exercise in ultimate sensual gratification that ended in the nuclear annihilation of all pleasure. It embodied every genre of film at once, each contaminated by its opposite[.]” More of Andrew O’Hehir’s discussion of Michael Bay’s Transformers films at Salon, including Tarkovsky’s Andrei Rublev, Bay’s credentials and Bay’s seeming exhaustion.

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