The Cultural Gutter

going through pop culture's trash since 2003

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“On The Trail Of The Golem”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Gutter’s own Keith tracks the story of Rabbi Loew and the Golem–with some dips into alchemy and art–through Prague.  “So how did Rabbi Loew’s name become associated with the legend of the golem? Well, it’s no surprise, really, given how much weird, wizardy stuff is already attributed to him. It seems more or less […]

Theater as Seance

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“In 1911, the famed American medium Anna Eva Fay held a public seance at the London Coliseum, inviting audience members to ask questions that she would answer by channelling the dead. Seated in the auditorium was Violet Coward, whose beloved 11-year-old son, Noël, had just begun his stage career after Violet spotted an advert in the […]

“Will Eisner, A Professional Cartoonist”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Settle in for a a master class on Will Eisner with comic creators, including Art Spiegelman” “[Eisner was] kinda cannibalizing all other visual metaphors and forms  to make his own comic book story. This certainly was a very strong theme for me.” (Find out more about the documentary and the companion book here. (Site in […]

The 39 Steps

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“Alfred Hitchcock’s original 1935 version of The 39 Steps is one of those films that’s so seminal that when watched today it can seem like little more than a parade of hoary old clichés; that is, until you consider that The 39 Steps is where many of those clichés originated.” Friend of the Gutter Todd […]

RIP, Hiroo Onoda

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Hiroo Onoda has died. Onoda was the last soldier of the Imperial Japanese Army to surrender, after hiding in the Philippines forest until 1974. Asia News and The New York Times have obituaries.

A Treasury of African-American Films Made For African-American Audiences

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Riverbends Genealogical and Historical Society has a collection of “race movies”: “The ‘race movie’ or ‘race film’ was a film genre which existed in the United States between about 1915 and 1950. It consisted of films produced for an all-black audience, featuring black casts. In all, approximately five hundred race films were produced. Of […]

In Memoriam, Run Run Shaw

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Gutter’s own Carol writes a little about Run Run Shaw, Shaw Brothers and TVB.  “So often we talk about history as this disembodied thing, these external events. And then there is someone like Sir Run Run, who contained almost the entire arc of modern entertainment in his lifetime, in his self.”

RIP, Run Run Shaw

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Film and television producer Run Run Shaw has died. Sir Run Run founded Shaw Brothers with his brother, Run Me Shaw. They produced hundreds of films in all genres, but were best known for their revolutionary kung fu and wuxia movies. Shaw also produced myriad television programs for TVB. The South China Morning Post remembers […]

RIP, Joan Fontaine

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Joan Fontaine has died. The Hollywood Reporter, The New York Times  and NPR have obituaries. Here are a clip of Fontaine in Suspicion, the trailer for Jane Eyre and Fontaine’s screen test for Rebecca. Fontaine co-hosts the Mike Douglas Show in 1967 here.

“Representation of Women in India Cinema and Beyond”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Text of Sharmila Tagore’s lecture on women and Indian cinema at the India International Centre. (via Memsaab Story)

RIP, Ida Pollock

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Author Ida Pollock has died. Writing under multiple noms de plume, Pollock published 120 books and was a founder of the Romantic Novelists Association. The Mary-Sue has an obituary. NPR talks with her daughter, Rosemary Pollock. The Telegraph has an overview of her career.

“Smart Set 400″

GetDownGutter_Thumb

A gallery of “Smart Set 400″  playing cards with pictures of women on the back, starting with ladies from 1909.

Joe Sacco’s Panorama of War

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Artist Joe Sacco talks with NPR about his latest book, The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. It’s a 24 foot panorama of one day. “Each panel in the panorama is dense and detailed. Fresh troops march in looking eager for battle. Some soldiers eat and relax, […]

James Joyce vs. Kool Keith

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Who said it, James Joyce or Kool Keith?

“The Aesthetic Politics of Filming Black Skin”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Ann Hornaday discusses “The Aesthetic Politics of Filming Black Skin”: “For the first hundred years of cinema, when images were captured on celluloid and processed photochemically, disregard for black skin and its subtle shadings was inscribed in the technology itself, from how film-stock emulsions and light meters were calibrated, to the models used as standards […]

“It’s A Graveyard Threat: Classic Monster Graves”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Odd Things I’ve Seen has a list of the final resting places of actors and actresses who have played classic horror characters. “This isn’t comprehensive, of course, and were I to try to make it so, I’d disappear into a hole in the Internet and not come up until this post was a 10-part mini-series […]

RIP, Frederick Pohl

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Author and Science Fiction Grandmaster Frederick Pohl has died. The Guardian has an obituary. Pohl’s blog has posted a short notice. The Library of Congress has a speech Pohl gave at Bookfest 2004. Frederick Pohl reads his story, “Day Million.”

“The Most Wicked Face of Theda Bara”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Hairpin looks at “The Most Wicked Face of Theda Bara”: “She was the first in a long line of what came to be known as femme fatales — dangerous, devouring women who pop up in various genres at cultural moments when anxiety over the woman’s place in society is at its highest. Bara anticipated […]

“The Cameraman’s Revenge”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

A 1912 silent short film of infidelity and insects by Władysław Starewicz. (via @NitrateDiva)

“Japanese Science Fiction of the 1930s”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Jess Nevins writes about Sato Minoru’s The Foreign Farm (1931), Japanese science fiction in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries and “the White Peril.”

keep looking »
  • The Book!

  • Support The Gutter

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Tin House has published an edition of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness illustrated by Matt Kish, an interesting follow-up to Kish’s project, Moby-Dick In Pictures; One Drawing For Every Page. See more of Kish’s work here.

    ~

    At Salon, Matt Ashby and Brendan Carroll write about irony and cynicism, sincerity and honesty in art: “At one time, irony served to challenge the establishment; now it is the establishment. The art of irony has turned into ironic art. Irony for irony’s sake. A smart aleck making bomb noises in front of a city in ruins. But irony without a purpose enables cynicism. It stops at disavowal and destruction, fearing strong conviction is a mark of simplicity and delusion.

    ~

    Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

    ~

    Get ready for a new season of Mad Men with this collection of Absurdist Mad Men promotions, which the Cultural Gutter participates in and even encourages. Duck Phillips rules an undersea advertizing empire and “Pete feels slighted.”

    ~

    Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film.

    ~

    Al-Jazeera America profiles John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, a documentary about Cambodian rock’n’roll and musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge. “Until 1975, music thrived in Phnom Penh, with clubs full night after night, crowds gathering in the streets around transistor radios to hear the latest releases, and the biggest stars being feted by the king. Enter the Khmer Rouge, communism and the war on intellectuals. Between 1975 and 1979, about 2 million Cambodians, roughly a third of the population, were rounded up and either were killed or died of starvation. Artists were particularly disliked by the Khmer Rouge, which saw creativity as decadence: Almost all of the biggest names perished during that era.”

    ~

  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.

    -------

  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: