The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

RIP, Casey Kasem

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Actor and DJ Casey Kasem has died. Kasem hosted American Top 40 and was the original voice of Shaggy in Scooby-Doo, voiced Robin in Batman (1968 cartoon) and Super Friends, and voiced Cliffjumper in Transformers: The Movie (1986) and multiple characters in the 1980s Transformers cartoon. At The Record, Bilal Qureshi remembers Kasem. The Washington […]

Kathy Bates Reads The Silence of the Lambs

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Thomas Harris’ The Silence Of The Lambs as read by Kathy Bates. Like this:Like Loading…

Manhunter on The Projection Booth

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Mike White, Rob St. Mary and the Mysterious Mr. X take a look at Michael Mann’s Manhunter with special guests Tom Noonan, Chris Elliott, Adam Resnick and Prof. Jonathan Rayner  at The Projection Booth. Like this:Like Loading…

101 Masterpieces: The Talented Mr. Ripley

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Mental Floss takes an in-depth look at Patricia Highsmith and The Talented Mr. Ripley. “With the charming sociopath Ripley, she’d created a new type of character entirely. In five novels over the next four decades, he’d become not only her most acclaimed and memorable creation but the prototype for a new kind of antihero: the […]

How Did This Get Made: Punisher: War Zone

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And director Lexi Alexander discusses making Punisher: War Zone (2008) with the Patton Oswalt and How Did This Get Made‘s Paul and June. (Thanks, Meow!) Like this:Like Loading…

The Akira Project

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An amazing fan-made trailer for a live-action adaptation of Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira. Like this:Like Loading…

RIP, Al Feldstein

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Al Feldstein has died. Feldstein got his start at EC Comics, creating Tales From The Crypt and several other titles, and later became editor for MAD Magazine. The Comics Journal, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine and Robot 6 have obituaries. NPR’s All Things Considered remembers Feldstein. At The Atlantic Wire, […]

RIP, Bob Hoskins

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Actor Bob Hoskins has died. Most sources are mentioning Who Framed Roger Rabbit, but Hoskins also appeared in Brazil, Nixon, The Long Good Friday, Pink Floyd The Wall, Unleashed, The Secret Agent and the tv show, Tales From The Crypt (“Fatal Caper”). And Hoskins was Chris Claremont’s first choice for Wolverine (via @Zemrag).  The Guardian, The […]

An Open Letter to John Chu

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“Is it so outrageous to think that someone my color would be rocking out in a girl band?” Lindsay Taylor reads an open letter to director John M. Chu, director of the upcoming live action film  Jem And The Holograms . Taylor talks about what the character Shana means to her as well as whitewashing, […]

Blurry Images Coming Clear: Hong Kong Cinema, Censorship and Me

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Every April, we like to switch things up at the Gutter, with the editors writing about something outside their domains. This week, Comics Editor Carol writes about subtitles, censorship and Hong Kong cinema. I don’t remember the first kung fu movie I ever watched. I am terrible at remembering “firsts.”  But I do remember the […]

“A Gaggle of Golgo 13″

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Over at Teleport City, Keith takes a look at live-action and animated adaptations of Takao Saito’s manga, Golgo 13. Like this:Like Loading…

Killers’ Style

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The Gutter’s own Keith has started a new side project, Killers’ Style, exploring the style of well-dressed villains. His first post is a look at Hannibal Lecter’s full Windsor knot. Like this:Like Loading…

Roger Corman on Edgar Allan Poe

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Roger Corman talks with the British Film Institute about Edgar Allan Poe and his film adaptations of Poe’s works. Like this:Like Loading…

RIP, Lorenzo Semple

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Screenwriter and creator of the Sixties Batman television series Lorenzo Semple has died. Besides Batman, Gutter readers might know Semple best from his screenplays for, The Parallax View, Flash Gordon (1980), Papillon, The Drowning Pool, Never Say Never Again, Sheena, and King Kong (1976). The Los Angeles Times,  The Hollywood Reporter and Comics Alliance have […]

Collection of R.K. Laxman Cartoons

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The Times of India has collected a gallery of satirical cartoons by R.K. Laxman. And here are episodes of R.K. Laxman Ki Duniya, a tv show based on his work. (Thanks, Sava!) Like this:Like Loading…

“What’s To Be Done With The Fantastic Four (Part 1)”

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Colin Smith returns to Too Busy Thinking About My Comics to ask, “What’s To Be Done With The Fantastic Four?” Like this:Like Loading…

Theater as Seance

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“In 1911, the famed American medium Anna Eva Fay held a public seance at the London Coliseum, inviting audience members to ask questions that she would answer by channelling the dead. Seated in the auditorium was Violet Coward, whose beloved 11-year-old son, Noël, had just begun his stage career after Violet spotted an advert in the […]

Steranko on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

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At The Hollywood Reporter, comics creator Jim Steranko watches Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. “So, let me ask you this question: If America were really under attack, would you actually want these SHIELD geeks calling the shots?” Like this:Like Loading…

“Star Wars: The Marvel Comics Years”

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The Superhero Satellite has an overview of Marvel’s Star Wars comics–with a pretty sweet gallery. (via @BlackHoleMovies) Like this:Like Loading…

Fun! Charm! Thrilling Adventure!

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The Thrilling Adventure Hour is a beacon in a grittily realistic, grimdark pop culture landscape, one guiding lost souls to fun, charm and adventure. And I’m glad to see The Thrilling Adventure Hour adapted from podcast radio play into graphic novel because I like what it portends for fun stories in the future and because […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Ashlee Blackwell considers Jonathan Demme’s Beloved as a horror film as part of their Black History & Women In Horror Month series. “Beloved takes us on one journey of the Black American experience of slavery through the body of a Black female protagonist.”

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    Watch Nigerian writer and director Nosa Igbinedion’s Oya: The Coming Of The Orishas here.

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    At Bitch Media, Sara Century wonders why Michonne isn’t in charge and considers which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: comics or tv. “As I was thinking about the numerous questionable writing choices made with these could-be-so-great female characters, I got to wondering, which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: the TV show or the comic? In other words, which one is less sexist?

    I wrote up a short list of the main female characters that appear both on the show and in the comic to decipher the differences in how these women are written. These descriptions contain spoilers through season five of the TV show, because it’s impossible to write about The Walking Dead without talking about how people die all the time.”

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    Vixen Varsity shares Olufemi Lee-Johnson’s tribute to Milestone Media and Dwayne McDuffie. “For the first time in my life, I was around comic writers of color telling stories that mirror or surpassed the storylines of America’s favorite heroes. Icon dealt with being the ultimate immigrant and not understanding current black culture. Rocket (Raquel Irvin) was his guide, but also aspired to be more than just a woman in the projects. Static (Virgil Hawkins) was just a normal teenager dealing with fitting into school and then was put into this extraordinary circumstance of being a hero. Hardware (Curtis Metcalf) wanted respect from his mentor, but later learned about the bigger picture when it came to being a hero and the characters from Blood Syndicate…they were just trying to make it day by day and maintain their respect as a gang.”

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    At Soundcheck, John Schaefer talks with Jim Jarmusch about “making music for someone else’s films, and a penchant for walking the tightrope between narrative and abstract art in his own movies. And if you thought his C.V. was looking a little thin, Jarmusch is also working on an upcoming opera about the Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla, with Robert Wilson and composer Phil Kline.” (Thanks, Kate!)

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    Alex Deuben interviews artist Nate Powell about the second volume of The March and working with Rep. John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. “We are taught — and we tend to perpetuate this myth — that the Civil Rights Movement was nine words long: ‘Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.’ I think what you’re saying really backs up that notion. In terms of John Lewis’ personal journey, ‘Book Two’ is certainly a deepening of discovery and involvement. Not just a worldview broadening, but becoming much more personally aware of the counter-escalation to any progress that the Movement made.”

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