The Cultural Gutter

going through pop culture's trash since 2003

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“Jeffrey Veregge: Art, Design, Mischief”

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A gallery of sweet geeky art from Native American artist, Jeffrey Veregge. “My origins are not supernatural, nor have they been enhanced by radioactive spiders. I am simply a Native American artist and writer whose creative mantra in best summed up with a word from my tribe’s own language as: ‘taʔčaʔx̣ʷéʔtəŋ,’ which means ‘get into […]

The Thing–Storyboard to Film Comparison”

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A side by side comparison of  Michael Ploog’s storyboards and shots from John Carpenter’s The Thing.

Gorgeous Handcut Paper Microbes and Pathogens

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A gallery of Rogan Brown’s handcut paper microbes and pathogens. (Thanks, Ceil!)

Wakanda Worldbuilding

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The Art of Darian is doing some very interesting Black Panther art, from magazine covers featuring T’Challa (aka, Black Panther) to Wakandan currency to portraying T’Challa addressing the UN on C-Span. (via @profmdwhite)

Sticks and Bones

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There is a gallery of Patrick Dougherty’s woven “Stickwork” installations in Salem, MA at Odd Things I’ve Seen. In a similar vein, you can see some of Joshua Walsh’s art and design for True Detective season 1.

80s Supervillain Album Art

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Comics Alliance has a gallery of supervillains in the style of Eighties album art by Rocky Davies.

Recreating the Tarot in Haiti

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The Haitian art collective Atis Rezistans and photographer Alice Smeets have created some amazing photographs recreating images from the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. See them here, watch a video of members of Atis Rezistans talking about the project and read an interview with Smeets. “The spirit of the Ghetto Tarot project is the inspiration to turn […]

“The Skate Girls of Kabul”

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Quartz has a gallery of Jessica Fulford-Dobson’s photographs of the skater girls of Kabul, Afghanistan.

“Auto Sketches from Detroit’s Golden Era You were Never Meant to See”

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PBS’ Newshour has a gallery of Norbert Ostrowski’s amazing automotive design sketches from 1946 to 1973. “The designs were never meant to leave the studios. Automakers routinely destroyed early sketches for fear they would fall into the wrong hands. But some of them made their way out of Ford, GM and Chrysler, as well as […]

“Unbranded”

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NPR interviews Hank Willis Thomas on his exhibition showcasing images of white women in advertizing. It’s a follow up to his 2008 exhibition, “Unbranded: Reflections in Black by Corporate America.” “I think what happens with ads — when we put text and logos on them, we do all the heavy lifting of making them make […]

“Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”

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At Hyperallergic, Jeremy Polacek writes about the history of Afrofuturism and the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s exhibit, “Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”:  “Afrofuturism is an empowering rubric, an approach and aesthetic that clarifies and connects history and the hope, creativity, and pain there within. Afrofuturism is wry, wise, and leveling — it believes that a brighter, more […]

Aubrey Beardsley in the Sixties

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Sweet Jane shares a 1967 fashion editorial shoot mixing mod fashion and the work of illustrator Aubrey Beardsley. (via arabellesicardi.com)

“Roz Chast’s Pysanky”

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The Paris Review shares some of cartoonist Roz Chast’s intriguingly painted Easter eggs. See more at her website.

“We Are Not Colonists”

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At Boing Boing, Gita Jackson writes about gaming, art, minority voices, colonialism and Benedict Anderson’s “imagined communities”: “When marginalized voices come to take their seat at the table, there will always be an outcry that they are invaders, colonists, inferior versions of their straight, white male counterparts. But rather than killing artforms, the addition of […]

“Lighten Up”

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At The Nib, Ronald Wimberley tells a story and elucidates the implications of being asked to lighten a character’s skin tone for a Wolverine And the X-Men jam comic.

SpeakEasy Radio, Episode 1

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Author and shenaniganist Kate Laity chats with the Gutter’s own Carol on the inaugural episode of SpeakEasy Radio. Topics include what the Speakeasy is all about, The Cultural Gutter and Vampire Prosecutor.

“10 Unretouched Romance Covers Reenacted By Real People”

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Cosmopolitan has a gallery of photographs of people re-enacting romance covers. (via C. Margery Kempe)

RIP, Leonard Nimoy

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Actor, director, writer and artist Leonard Nimoy has died. Nimoy was most famous for playing Spock in Star Trek, but he also appeared in Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), In Search Of…, Ancient Mysteries, Columbo, Fringe, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Faerie Tale Theatre, Mission: Impossible, Dragnet and Bonanza.  Nimoy directed Three Men And A […]

The Gender-Swapped DC Universe

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Comics Alliance has a sweet gallery of art, in which artists including Ming Doyle, Erica Henderson, John Quinones, Jordan Gibson, Lauren Moran and Jason Margos gender-swapped the heroes and villains of the DC Universe. (Look for more under #DCBend on Tumblr and Twitter). (Thanks, Mark!)

“Tetrahedra of Space” and Other Frank R. Paul Covers

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Dangerous Minds has a gallery of Frank R. Paul’s pulp science fiction covers. (via Stephanie Johnson).

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At the New Republic, B. D. McClay writes about Shirley Jackson and a new collection containing previously unpublished stories and essays by Jackson. “Let Me Tell You, on the other hand, is for the already-converted fan, who will be delighted to read so many new stories and essays. The greatest attraction is the 15 essays, which touch on subjects as diverse as the travails of being married to a book critic (‘book reviewing is just nothing for a healthy young girl to be married to’), Samuel Richardson (‘no small action is consummated in less than ten pages’), poltergeist-bearing postcards (‘I think it is simply too much for any one house to have poltergeists and children’), and clowns.”

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    At Teleport City, the Gutter’s own Carol writes about 12 books that vary in reputability and their harrowing nature. They include books by Shirley Jackson, Raymond Chandler, Patricia Highsmith and Herman Melville.

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    Anne Billson has posted a 1985 interview she did with director George Miller (the Mad Max films). Miller talks about many things including Aunty Entity’s probable past as a hero and Max as, in Mel Gibson’s words, “a closet human being.” (Thanks, Matt!)

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    At New York Magazine, David Wallace-Wells writes about bees, colony collapse disorder and beekeeper Dave Hackenberg. “It’s been a long decade for bees. We’ve been panicking about them nonstop since 2006, when beekeeper Dave Hackenberg inspected 2,400 hives wintering in Florida and found 400 of them abandoned — totally empty. American beekeepers had experienced dramatic die-offs before, as recently as the previous winter in California and in regular bouts with a deadly bug called the varroa mite since the 1980s. But those die-offs would at least produce bodies pathologists could study. Here, the bees had just disappeared. In the U.K., they called it Mary Celeste syndrome, after the merchant ship discovered off the Azores in 1872 with not a single passenger aboard. The bees hadn’t even scrawled CROATOAN in honey on the door on their way out of the hive.”

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    Andrew Nette has a pair of interesting pieces on pulp you might be interested in. First, he writes about “the New Pulp” and a bit about Fifty Shades of Gray in “Fifty Shades of Pulp.” Then he writes about pulp and literacy and furthering social advancement in “Pulp and Circumstance.”  “Most people view pulp as either exploitative lowbrow culture or highly collectable retro artefact. Yet pulp has a secret history which Rabinowitz’s book uncovers. Her central thesis is that cheap, mass-produced pulp novels not only provided entertainment and cheap titillating thrills, but also brought modernism to the American people, democratising reading and, in the process, furthering culture and social enlightenment.”

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    The Projection Booth interviews actor Ed Asner.

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