The Cultural Gutter

the cult in your pop culture

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

The Titanic, Mechanical, Time-Traveling Elephant.

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“The Sultan’s Elephant was a show created by the Royal de Luxe theatre company, involving a huge moving mechanical elephant, a giant marionette of a girl and other associated public art installations. In French it was called, La visite du sultan des Indes sur son éléphant à voyager dans le temps (literally, “Visit from the […]

So Much Art

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So much art available for your browsing pleasure as the Smithsonian puts 40,000 pieces of Asian art from the Freer and Saeckler Collection online. Like this:Like Loading…

An Alien Film That Never Was

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Neil Blomkamp has been sharing concept art for his unproduced Alien film. “The idea behind the film is that everything from Alien 3 didn’t happen and it would have followed Sigourney Weaver’s Ripley & Michael Biehn’s Hicks infiltrating the Weyland Yutani corporation. Just that little synopsis and the great artwork makes me so sad that […]

“A Christmas Carol,” with Illustrations by John Leech

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Project Gutenberg has a copy of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” complete with scans of the cover and John Leech’s illustrations from the first edition. Like this:Like Loading…

Parks and Trek

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Neill Cameron has re-imagined the characters of Parks & Recreation as members of Starfleet. (Via @neillcameron) Like this:Like Loading…

“Four Continental Black Afrikan Speculative Fiction Artists”

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Chronicles of Harriet profiles Black African artists who work in speculative fiction: Loyiso Mkizse; Tobe “Max Spectre” Ezeogu; Setor Fiadzigbey; and the artist of Kiro’o Games. Like this:Like Loading…

“Visible Girls: London’s Lost Female Subcultures”

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Dangerous Minds has a gallery of photographs from Anita Corbins project photographing young women in 1980s London. “In the early 1980s, photographer Anita Corbin documented the ‘informal uniforms’ of young women’s subcultures across London. Corbin photographed rude girls, rockabillies, mods, skinheads, and some ‘less defined’ female groups including soul, rasta, punk and futurist, as well […]

Philip Pullman on William Blake

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Author Philip Pullman talks about the work of William Blake at The Guardian: “My mind and my body reacted to certain lines from the Songs of Innocence and of Experience, from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, from ‘Auguries of Innocence,’ from Europe, from America with the joyful immediacy of a flame leaping to meet […]

“The Satanic Children’s Big Book of Activities”

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Get your own copy of the Satanic Temple’s The Satanic Children’s Big Book of Activities! Like this:Like Loading…

A Collection of Calaveras

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The Library of Congress has scans of José Guadalupe Posada broadsheet illustrations, including many calaveras for your enjoyment! Like this:Like Loading…

Masks

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Dangerous Minds has a gallery of  papier-mâché masks made by Krista Argale and a gallery of “demonic and dramatic” horned masks made by Aisha Voya. (Thanks, Kate!) Like this:Like Loading…

Philippe Druillet’s Necronomicon

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A gallery of pages from Philippe Druillet’s Nccronomicon. (Via elmatpe and thanks, Steven!) Like this:Like Loading…

Bell Hanuman

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An interactive sculpture of Hanuman made from 26,000 light bells made by Charuvi Design Labs. to promote their film Sri Hanuman Chalisa. Here is a video of the interactive experience. (Thanks, Beth!) Like this:Like Loading…

Valeria Brancaforte’s Hand-Printed Books

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The Book Design Blog has a gallery of Valeria Brancaforte’s hand-printed books. Like this:Like Loading…

“Lights Out, Please”

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“Lights Out, Please combines retellings of traditional ghost stories and urban legends, alongside new, personal stories from a variety of international authors in order to tell others about the kinds of fears we live with. We tell our stories as a ghost story or urban legend to get people to believe us.” Find out more here […]

Photography’s Antichrist

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At The Guardian, Chris Campion writes about American photographer William Mortensen, who specialized in the eerie, the grotesque, the fantastic and the macabre. “In his own writings, Mortensen invoked Hogarth, Beardsley, Daumier and Goya as his forebears. But he also had much in common – in technique, style and approach – with European outlier artists […]

RIP, Geoffrey Holder

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Actor, dancer, choreographer, director, designer and artist Geoffrey Holder has died. Besides his iconic role as Baron Samedi in Live And Let Die (1973), he directed and designed the costumes for the 1975 stage production of The Wiz, performed as the Metropolitan Opera Ballet’s principal dancer in 1955-6, choreographed pieces for the Holder Dance Company […]

“We Need Diverse Books”

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The Washington Post has a transcript of American Born Chinese and Boxers & Saints creator Gene Luen Yang’s speech at the 2014 National Book Festival Gala.  “We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say. This fear can be a good […]

Advice On Writing People Different From You

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At Midnight Breakfast, Mari Naomi shares a question from a white friend “Aside from doing research in order to make a believable character, in addition to leaving one’s personal (and media-learned) biases at the door, I don’t know the right answer to my friend’s question. How can she infuse [People of Color] into her story […]

“Marguerite Sauvage’s Wonder Woman and the Slowly Changing Face of Comic Book Fashion”

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At Comics Alliance, Juliet Kahn writes about clothing and costumes in comics, getting Wonder Woman right and Marguerite Sauvage’s work in Sensation Comics #7. “The slightest hint of a damn given to the fashion featured in a comic book makes it immediately more immersive, more affecting, more resonant—because suddenly, its characters look more like real […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    The Gutter’s own Carol infiltrates Teleport City‘s limits to contribute to TC’s Space: 1999 series with her piece on aliens and what big jerks they are. “Space: 1999 taught me two valuable lessons. The first is that space is depressing and best represented by the color taupe. The second is that, with few exceptions, aliens are jerks.”

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    The Dartmouth College Library ahs scans of the oldest extant comic book, Rodolphe Töpffer’s
    “The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck” (1837). (via @SoxOnTheBrain)

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    At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Carolyn looks at Lizzie Borden’s Born In Flames (1983) and the character, Adelaide Norris. “Born in Flames was revolutionary for its time, and I think it is still relevant today. This film has many layers, with both a speculative as well as a science fictional representation of a parallel universe that denies oppression. One of the main characters, Adelaide Norris played by Jean Satterfield, came to the forefront for me because of her race and role in the story. Adelaide is one of the key characters who pulls the female troops together. With the help of her mentor Zella, played by civil rights lawyer Flo Kennedy, this young Black and gay woman tirelessly researches, advises, and recruits women to fight the good fight for equality.”

    ~

    A video tribute to interactive VCR games including: Nightmare (1991), The Fisherman VCR Bible Game (1989), Rich Little’s Charades (1985), Wayne’s World VCR Game (1992), Star Trek: The Next Generation VCR Game (1995) and Skull and Crossbones (1988). (Thanks, Beth!)

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    At The Los Angeles Review Of Books, Suzannah Showler writes about the complexity of the reality tv show The Bachelor and her complicated love for it. “I love The Bachelor the way I love most things, which is to say: complicatedly. On the one hand, I think it’s a fascinating cultural product, one I find great delight in close-reading. But I also love it, frankly, because I just like watching it. I think it’s top-notch entertainment, and I will straight up hip-check my politics out of the way, and give up many hours of my life, in the name of being entertained.” (Via @idontlikemunday)

    ~

    At Comics Alliance, Chris Sims recounts that time the Punisher battled Dr. Doom. “It starts off with Dr. Doom kicking it in an extradimensional conference room set up by Loki to coordinate mass villainy, where he is just ripping into the Kingpin for being unable to kill the Punisher….Thus, in a sterling example of the ‘well then why don’t you do it’ school of super-villain cameraderie, Dr. Doom, a man who built a time machine in his basement, heads off to try his luck at fighting the Punisher, a man who has a gun. He does this, as you might expect, by luring him to a quarry and — after a brief exchange between a Doombot and a minigun — attempting to blow up his van with a tank.”

    ~

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