The Cultural Gutter

geek chic with mad technique

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“Let’s Talk About The Women Of The Walking Dead

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At Bitch Media, Sara Century wonders why Michonne isn’t in charge and considers which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: comics or tv. “As I was thinking about the numerous questionable writing choices made with these could-be-so-great female characters, I got to wondering, which medium is better for the ladies of […]

“A Tribute to Dwayne McDuffie and Milestone Media”

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Vixen Varsity shares Olufemi Lee-Johnson’s tribute to Milestone Media and Dwayne McDuffie. “For the first time in my life, I was around comic writers of color telling stories that mirror or surpassed the storylines of America’s favorite heroes. Icon dealt with being the ultimate immigrant and not understanding current black culture. Rocket (Raquel Irvin) was […]

Nate Powell Talks about The March, Depicting Violence and “I Have A Dream’

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Alex Deuben interviews artist Nate Powell about the second volume of The March and working with Rep. John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. “We are taught — and we tend to perpetuate this myth — that the Civil Rights Movement was nine words long: ‘Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.’ I think what […]

Interview with Kelly Sue DeConnick

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At Vox, Alex Abad-Santos interviews Kelly Sue DeConnick about feminism, raising girls and her new comic, Bitch Planet. “DeConnick says Bitch Planet, which debuted late last year, is her take on the exploitation films she loved as a kid. The sci-fi prison saga is confident, slick, and hilarious on multiple levels. But it also vibrates with frustration […]

“She-Hulk, Attorney at Law”

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At Bitch Magazine, Tammy Oler writes about the history and legal life of Jennifer Walters, attorney and She-Hulk. (Thanks, Mark!) Like this:Like Loading…

“The Pull List: Black History Month”

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At Tor.com, Alex Brown shares her top ten favorite Black comic book characters. “For all their talk about diversity and inclusion, comic books still tend to be pretty straight, white, and male (and catered to same). But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a lot of great characters of color that do more than fill the […]

My Year With The Fantastic Four

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Days after we rang in the New Year, I finished a year spent reading all of the Fantastic Four comics, from Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s earth-shattering first issue in 1961, which explained how four family members and friends were transformed by cosmic rays into super-powered adventurers, through the latest issues in 2015 by James […]

Transformers: The Romance of the Machine

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Hasbro’s toy brand Transformers turned thirty last year. Children around the world have been hearing the Transformers’ story for decades, passed on by cartoons, comics, movies, and toys. It’s always the same, more or less. An alien race of transforming robots is at war, divided into two factions: the villainous Decepticons, led by Megatron, and […]

Interview With Colin Smith

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Comics Bulletin interviews friend of the Gutter Colin Smith about criticism in general and comics criticism in particular. “Despite what so many in the ever-polarising blogosphere appear to believe, criticism isn’t about delivering an opinion that the reader agrees with, or even feels comfortable with. It’s not about standing with this crowd or that, but […]

“The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck”

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The Dartmouth College Library ahs scans of the oldest extant comic book, Rodolphe Töpffer’s “The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck” (1837). (via @SoxOnTheBrain) Like this:Like Loading…

Little Fat Nothing: Herbie Popnecker and Early Meta-Comics Narratives

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Publicly admitting you read comics means you’re willing to put up with a perplexingly persistent notion of the medium as the exclusive domain of the super heroes. Even in the current realm of savvy pop art dabblers as likely to pray at the altar of independents like Image Comics as they are the Big Two […]

Best of 2014 at Popshifter!

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The Gutter’s own Carol was invited to join Less Lee Moore and J.G. Thirlwell and other swell folk in sharing “Best of 2014″ lists at Popshifter! Like this:Like Loading…

Evan’s Best of 2014

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Author, illustrator, writer and friend of the Gutter Evan Munday shares a variety things in “The Best of 2014″: “Though no one will care at all and my taste is, by most measures, truly heinous, here are lists of things – namely comic books, movies, songs, and (new!) unfulfilled projects–I greatly enjoyed in the year […]

Never Goodnight is the Best

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The Dissolve shares some panels from the source material for Lukas Moodysson’s Swedish punk rock coming of age story, We Are The Best–Coco Moodysson’s graphic novel, Never Goodnight, about her experience growing up punk in 1980s Stockholm. The Dissolve piece also links to an interview with Coco Moodysson at Female First and a New York Times […]

Chris Sims on Comics and Lettering

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At Comics Alliance, Chris Sims talk abouts the art of lettering in comics. “Comic book lettering is up there with inking and coloring in the holy trinity of underrated comic book skills, but it’s also one of those things that, once you start paying attention to it, you’ll never be able to not notice it […]

7 Star Wars comics to read before they’re gone

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Comics Alliance suggests seven Star Wars comics to read before Disney makes them disappear. (Including a comic by one of Comics Editor Carol’s favorite creative teams–Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman). “Starting in 2015, Disney’s handing the publishing of any and all new Star Wars comics over to Marvel Comics, with an all new, optimized-for-corporate-synergy canon […]

“Charles M. Schulz and Peanuts: The Longest Jazz Solo in History”

At Sequential Art, Greg Carpenter writes a lovely piece about Charles Schulz’ Peanuts. “After only two installments, Schulz had solidified the rules for his comic strip.  Random acts of cruelty would punctuate this irrational world, and Schulz’s trapped little adults would be forced to act out simulations of human behavior, using hollow gestures to try […]

Parks and Trek

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Neill Cameron has re-imagined the characters of Parks & Recreation as members of Starfleet. (Via @neillcameron) Like this:Like Loading…

“Four Continental Black Afrikan Speculative Fiction Artists”

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Chronicles of Harriet profiles Black African artists who work in speculative fiction: Loyiso Mkizse; Tobe “Max Spectre” Ezeogu; Setor Fiadzigbey; and the artist of Kiro’o Games. Like this:Like Loading…

“I Love Superheroes But They Don’t Love Me”

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At Feminist Sonar, Elsa writes about the representation of disability and superhero comics and movies. “Some days I wonder if I take things like this too personally, but honestly, in a world where Hawkeye was once Deaf but is now hearing, in a culture where Oracle has been returned to her walking self and is […]

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    Watch Nigerian writer and director Nosa Igbinedion’s Oya: The Coming Of The Orishas here.

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    At Bitch Media, Sara Century wonders why Michonne isn’t in charge and considers which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: comics or tv. “As I was thinking about the numerous questionable writing choices made with these could-be-so-great female characters, I got to wondering, which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: the TV show or the comic? In other words, which one is less sexist?

    I wrote up a short list of the main female characters that appear both on the show and in the comic to decipher the differences in how these women are written. These descriptions contain spoilers through season five of the TV show, because it’s impossible to write about The Walking Dead without talking about how people die all the time.”

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    Vixen Varsity shares Olufemi Lee-Johnson’s tribute to Milestone Media and Dwayne McDuffie. “For the first time in my life, I was around comic writers of color telling stories that mirror or surpassed the storylines of America’s favorite heroes. Icon dealt with being the ultimate immigrant and not understanding current black culture. Rocket (Raquel Irvin) was his guide, but also aspired to be more than just a woman in the projects. Static (Virgil Hawkins) was just a normal teenager dealing with fitting into school and then was put into this extraordinary circumstance of being a hero. Hardware (Curtis Metcalf) wanted respect from his mentor, but later learned about the bigger picture when it came to being a hero and the characters from Blood Syndicate…they were just trying to make it day by day and maintain their respect as a gang.”

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    At Soundcheck, John Schaefer talks with Jim Jarmusch about “making music for someone else’s films, and a penchant for walking the tightrope between narrative and abstract art in his own movies. And if you thought his C.V. was looking a little thin, Jarmusch is also working on an upcoming opera about the Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla, with Robert Wilson and composer Phil Kline.” (Thanks, Kate!)

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    Alex Deuben interviews artist Nate Powell about the second volume of The March and working with Rep. John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. “We are taught — and we tend to perpetuate this myth — that the Civil Rights Movement was nine words long: ‘Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.’ I think what you’re saying really backs up that notion. In terms of John Lewis’ personal journey, ‘Book Two’ is certainly a deepening of discovery and involvement. Not just a worldview broadening, but becoming much more personally aware of the counter-escalation to any progress that the Movement made.”

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    At Vox, Alex Abad-Santos interviews Kelly Sue DeConnick about feminism, raising girls and her new comic, Bitch Planet. “DeConnick says Bitch Planet, which debuted late last year, is her take on the exploitation films she loved as a kid. The sci-fi prison saga is confident, slick, and hilarious on multiple levels. But it also vibrates with frustration over the sexism still alive today and the impatience in wanting to eliminate it.”

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