The Cultural Gutter

going through pop culture's trash since 2003

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Interview with Kate Beaton


At the Guardian, Kate Beaton talks about comics, history and her years working in Alberta’s oil sands.

Sequential Facts: Big Books Offered An Education in Comic Styles


Comics Editor Carol is off convincing mummies that those ladies who look like their beloved are spunky archaeologists who have their own lives now, thank you very much. She’s also running the official TIFF Midnight Madness and Vanguard program blogs and will be back next month. Now, please enjoy this fantastic piece by Nick Hanover. […]

Beta Ray Bill, Fin Fang Foom and Frog Thor!

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

Thirteen Covers celebrates Walt Simonson’s birthday with… 13 covers, including Beta Ray Bill, Fin Fang Foom and Frog Thor!

“Of Course Kimber and Stormer are Gay”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Autostraddle, Heather Hogan has “a Recap of Jem and the Holograms’ Truly Outrageous Lesbianism.” (Thanks, Sara Century!) “If you are a woman over the age of 30, I have some information that is going to send you cartwheeling back to 1987 to high five your young self and shout “We knew it! We knew it!” right in your […]

Gail Simone on Yvonne Craig

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

Gail Simone remembers Yvonne Craig. “I knew a lot of boys who wanted to be Batman. But from that day to this, I wanted to be Batgirl. And to me, Yvonne Craig was Batgirl.”

Bitch Planet Studies Exploitation With Exploitation”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Sequential Art, Ian Dawe writes about Kelly Sue Deconnick and Valentine de Landro’s comic, Bitch Planet. “The first thing to understand about this comic is that it’s a deep homage to 1970s science fiction, sports movies and exploitation pornography. Artist Valentine De Landro uses the visual language of films like 1974’s Caged Heat, but […]

“How To Interview Japanese Manga Artists: Tips for Western Journalists”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Manga Comics Manga, Deb Aoki starts a conversation about suggestions in interviewing Japanese manga creators. “Here’s our tips for pre-interview prep, interview questions to avoid, tips for having more productive conversations with comics pros from Japan, plus seven requests that I’d like to make to publicists, convention guest coordinators and publishers that might help […]

“Who Was Jack Kirby’s Darkseid?”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Too Busy Thinking About My Comics, Colin Smith begins an in-depth look at Jack Kirby’s most anti-life creation, Darkseid. “What follows is my attempt to work out the character of Kirby’s Darkseid during those two wonderful years in the early 1970s, when DC Comics had handed The King four spaces in their publishing schedule […]

John Ostrander on The Killing Joke Animated Feature

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

John Ostrander writes about the upcoming animated feature of The Killing Joke, his reaction to the assault on Barbara Gordon and his and Kim Yale’s reinvention of Barbara Gordon as Oracle. “The last story that Kim and I worked on together before she died was Oracle Year One, drawn by the wonderful Brian Stelfreeze. We […]

“Watercolor Superheroes Made Of Big Color Splashes”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

deMilked has a gallery of lovely superhero watercolors by Blule (Clementine Campardou). (via S. L. Johnson)  

“Super City: New York and the History of Comic Books”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

The Bowery Boys Podcast dedicates an episode to New York City in the history of comic books. “In the 1890s a newspaper rivalry between William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer helped bring about the birth of the comic strip and, a few decades later, the comic book.  Today, comic book superheroes are bigger than ever — […]

One Comic: “When Red Sonja met her match(ish)”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

Pornokitsch’s One Comic Podcast looks at Red Sonja #10: “To everyone’s surprise, despite some of the covers and the character’s reputation, this isn’t the exploitative boobs’n’swordplay production it could have been. How did it achieve that? Listen and find out.”

Matt Fraction on Collaboration


“I write for my partners. I write with them and to them. I seek collaborators and co-conspirators rather than employees. I share ownership of the books I do (Hawkeye obviously an exception) with the artists for whom I write as a rule. They make more than me, too, as a rule, and they earn it. […]

“Shifts and Living History”


At Comics 212, Christopher Butcher has some interesting thoughts about recent shifts in comics. “So, basically, my theory goes that the manga boom in the late 90s sort of blew up every single thing that the industry thought about comics, and who the audience is for comics, and what comics can do….So how did the rest of […]

Interview with Noelle Stevenson


Joanna Robinson interviews Noelle Stevenson. “Since she left art school, Stevenson has been busier than ever. At 23 years old, Stevenson just had the kind of year that would make even the most seasoned comics writer turn Hulk green with envy. She co-launched a wildly successful all-girl comic series, Lumberjanes; HarperCollins published a trade edition […]

Thoughts on J.G. Jones & Mark Waid’s Strange Fruit


At Women Write About comics, J. A. Micheline writes about “The White Privilege, White Audacity and White Priorities of Strange Fruit #1.” JG Jones & Mark Waid’s new comic about an alien landing in the American South in 1927, an alien who appears as a Black man. Meanwhile, Joseph Phillip Illidge had written about the […]

Interview with Fiona Staples


The New York Times profiles artist Fiona Staples and talks with her about her work on the new Archie comic and Saga. Also, she answers their, “Are you a Betty or a Veronica?”question just fine.

“Jeffrey Veregge: Art, Design, Mischief”


A gallery of sweet geeky art from Native American artist, Jeffrey Veregge. “My origins are not supernatural, nor have they been enhanced by radioactive spiders. I am simply a Native American artist and writer whose creative mantra in best summed up with a word from my tribe’s own language as: ‘taʔčaʔx̣ʷéʔtəŋ,’ which means ‘get into […]

Like Mad Max: Fury Road, but lazier and crappier


At the Mary-Sue, Ana Mardoll reviews Vertigo’s new Furiosa comic, which theoretically presents Imperator Furiosa’s backstory by trying to make Mad Max: Fury Road lazier and shittier. “We need to talk about the Mad Max: Fury Road Furiosa #1 comic and how awful it is. Huge content notes on this post, like, in big block […]

“Floating Eyeballs, Trained Bees”

At NPR’s Monkey See, Glen Weldon reviews Jon Morris’ The League of Regrettable Superheroes and considers the most intriguing comic book heroes of yore. “Truth in advertising: The Eye was a mysterious, giant, floating, all-knowing eyeball that hectored people to fight crime on its behalf. Which they did, and can you blame them?” (Thanks, Pauline!)

keep looking »
  • Support The Gutter

  • The Book!

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Playboy, Jake Rossen writes about the story behind the filming and the restoration of Manos: The Hands of Fate. “For a long time no one wanted to see it unless it was accompanied by MST3K’s taunts. Then, in 2011, a collector of film prints uncovered the original negative of Manos and embarked on an inexplicable project to restore the film with all the white-glove attention archivists give to Hollywood classics. His efforts would incur the wrath of a mysterious man with a fake New Zealand accent named Rupert, as well as Joe Warren, Hal Warren’s embittered son, who intends to preserve the Manos legacy at all costs.” (Thanks, Ed!)


    At Die, Danger, Die, Die, Kill!, Todd reviews the two part Ghanian director Ninja’s film, 2016. “2016 is a movie that I am obligated to review by virtue of my having long ago joined the internet chorus of people trumpeting on about its insane trailer—and this despite the fact that all of you with any interest in seeing it have most likely tracked it down already. In that case, you already know that it is essentially a no-budget remake of Independence Day set in the suburbs of Ghana. And if that sounds like a massive over-reach to you, you obviously know very little about Ghanaian action cinema, and even less about the films of maverick multi-hyphenate Ninja.”

    Read about part one, here, and part two, here.


    Look, it’s the trailer for “The Abominable Snowman” a new episode of classic Thunderbirds. Huffington Post UK has more: “It’s exactly half a century since we heard the ominous tones of voice actor Peter Dyneley bringing us the Thunderbirds intro ‘5 -4 – 3 – 2 -1 Thunderbirds are go’, and to celebrate, the team are producing three brand new original episodes, based on audio-only recordings made in 1966, which means fans will get to enjoy the original voices, with some 21st century gadgetry thrown in on screen.” (Thanks, Todd!)


    At the Guardian, Elizabeth Day talks with Geena Davis about feminism, sexism in the film industry and the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. “I mean, it’s freaky when you start examining it. For decades it’s been the same ratio – we’ve all grown up on that ratio. Could it be that women’s presence stalls at about the rate of female participation in the fiction that we watch? Could it be you get to that level and you feel done? That that looks normal? It’s just a completely unconscious image that we have in our heads that women only need to take up a certain amount of space and then we’ve done right by them.”


    At fbomb, Sabrina N. interviews Ashley Armitage. “21-year-old Seattle-based photographer and filmmaker Ashley Armitage’s work is largely a tribute to female friendships and femininity. Her dreamy, nuanced photography lets viewers into the intimate, magical moments of girlhood. They depict beauty routines and sleepovers. They unabashedly celebrate and normalize body hair, tampons and bras. The collection is a celebration of girlhood by one of its own products.” (via @GeekGirlCon)


    You can read every issue of No Magazine. “Be warned before you download and open these issues—they aren’t exactly safe for workplace viewing. If Larry Flynt and the Vienna Aktionists got together and published a punk zine in the late ‘70s, it would have looked a lot like NO MAG. NO MAG‘s publisher Bruce Kalberg, and the sordid turns of his life, were recently covered in LA Weekly‘s piece ‘Beautiful Loser, Tortured Killer.’”  (Thanks, Stephanie).


  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.


  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: