The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Interview with Park Joon-Hung

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Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

Roger Corman on Edgar Allan Poe

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Roger Corman talks with the British Film Institute about Edgar Allan Poe and his film adaptations of Poe’s works.

RIP, Věra Chytilová

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Czech filmmaker Věra Chytilová has died. She was a central director in the Czech New Wave in the 1960s and is probably best known for her film, Daisies (1966). The Prague Post, The Houston Chronicle, The AV Club and The New York Times have obituaries. Fresques has an interview with Chytilová.

RIP, Harold Ramis

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Actor, writer and director Harold Ramis has died. He is probably best known for  SCTV, Animal House, Meatballs, Stripes, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters II, and Groundhog Day. He also had memorable roles in As Good As It Gets and Knocked Up.  The Chicago Tribune, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. The […]

True Detective’s Six-Minute Tracking Shot

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At MTV, Cary Fukunaga shares the story of his 6-minute long, single tracking shot in an episode of True Detective. “Having used the technique in both of his feature films, Sin Nombre and Jane Eyre, Fukunaga signed onto True Detective knowing that he wanted to include a long take at some point, because he considers […]

RIP, Philip Seymour Hoffman

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Actor and director Philip Seymour Hoffman has died. Hoffman performed in numerous films including, The Master, Capote, Magnolia, The Hunger Games, Mary and Max, and The Talented Mr. Ripley.  There are a collection of tributes at RogerEbert.com. The Dissolve‘s editors reflect on Hoffman’s work. At Monkey See, Linda Holmes writes about Hoffman and the blessings […]

RIP, Arthur Rankin, Jr.

Animator, director and producer Arthur Rankin, Jr. has died. Rankin is probably best known for his Rankin/Bass studio’s holiday television specials such as Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town and Mad Monster Party. He also produced and directed The Last Unicorn, The Hobbit (1977), The Return Of The King (1980), The […]

RIP, Hal Sutherland

Animator, director, Filmation co-founder and painter Hal Sutherland has died. Sutherland is probably best known for Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, The Archies and Star Trek animated series. Sutherland  Indiewire has an obituary.  StarTrek.com remembers Sutherland. StarTrek.com has a two-part interview with Sutherland here.

RIP, Tom Laughlin

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Actor/writer/director/producer Tom Laughlin has died. Laughlin is best known for his Billy Jack series of films. The New York Times and The LA Times have obituaries. NPR remembers Laughlin. Here’s a promotional short from Warner Bros. featuring a demonstration from Master Bong Soo Han. And Laughlin talks about the Billy Jack films on Good Morning, […]

Interview with Gareth Evans

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City On Fire Podcast interviews Gareth Evans, director of Merantau; The Raid; and the upcoming, The Raid 2: Berandal. (Via The Heroic Sisterhood)

RIP, Antonia Bird

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Director and producer Antonia Bird has died. Bird is probably best known for her films Ravenous (1999) and Priest (1994), but she also directed UK television series, episodes and  tv movies such as, The Village,  Cracker, MI-5, Inspector Morse and EastEnders. The BBC has an obituary. The Guardian has collected tributes to Bird. The Guardian […]

RIP, Hal Needham

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Director, stunt coordinator  and stuntman Hal Needham has died. Needham directed Smokey and the Bandit and The Cannonball Run, but he also performed and coordinated stunts in The French Connection II, Three The Hard Way, Chinatown, Our Man Flint, The War Wagon and Blazing Saddles. and in television shows such as, Mission: Impossible, Star Trek, […]

Interview with Kenji Kamiyama

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Andrez Bergen interviews anime director Kenji Kamiyama for Madman.

Interviews and Q&A from Midnight Madness 2013

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All the red carpet interviews and post-screening question and answer sessions from this year’s Midnight Madness Programme at the Toronto International Film Festival.  And all conducted by friend of The Gutter and Soldier of Cinema, Robert Mitchell! [Update: Link fixed!]

Lau Kar-Leung Remembered

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The Ferroni Brigade considers how Lau Kar-Leung brought comedy to kung fu as well as scrutinized the kung fu film tradition that had come before him.  David Bordwell writes about Lau and how sometimes stylized action captures the real better than “realism.”

RIP, Lau Kar-Leung

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Actor, director, writer and action choreographer Lau Kar-Leung has died. Most widely known as the director of 36th Chamber of Shaolin, Lau has an extensive filmography. He collaborated with director Chang Cheh and, in his own work, brought humor to and a singular action choreography to his own films, Dirty Ho, Mad Monkey Kung Fu, […]

Interview with Takashi Miike

The Hollywood Reporter interviews director Takashi Miike about his new film, Shield of Straw: ” In Japan now, films are very safe. When I was young and went to old cinemas, they had a distinctive feel, an adult smell about them. As you got in your seat and the lights went down, there was a […]

RIP, Jesus Franco

Director, writer and actor Jésus “Jess” Franco has died. Franco directed just under two hundred films between 1957 and 2012. Chris Alexander writes a tribute to Franco at Fangoria. Here’s footage of Franco accepting his Goya Award. And here, Franco talks about horror movies and the production of Bloody Moon. Update: The Guardian has an […]

“Classical Filmmaking: The Theme that Drives all of Sam Raimi’s Movies”

Matt Singer explores two elements that recur in all of Sam Raimi’s films, Pandora’s box and, “The Classic,” a 1973 Delta 88. “Using The Classic to play Uncle Ben’s car may have just been a fortuitous way for Raimi to shoehorn in his beloved trademark, but in the larger context of his career, it imbues […]

Reservoir Dogs at The Projection Booth

Mr. White and Mr. St. Mary have an in-depth look at Reservoir Dogs at The Projection Booth podcast. Special Guests: podcaster Jamie Jenkins, Film Threat‘s Paul Zimmerman and Reservoir Dogs executive producer, Monte Hellman. Special features include, Mike White’s video, “Who Do You Think You’re Fooling?” comparing Ringo Lam’s City On Fire and Reservoir Dogs, […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Tin House has published an edition of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness illustrated by Matt Kish, an interesting follow-up to Kish’s project, Moby-Dick In Pictures; One Drawing For Every Page. See more of Kish’s work here.

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    At Salon, Matt Ashby and Brendan Carroll write about irony and cynicism, sincerity and honesty in art: “At one time, irony served to challenge the establishment; now it is the establishment. The art of irony has turned into ironic art. Irony for irony’s sake. A smart aleck making bomb noises in front of a city in ruins. But irony without a purpose enables cynicism. It stops at disavowal and destruction, fearing strong conviction is a mark of simplicity and delusion.

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    Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

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    Get ready for a new season of Mad Men with this collection of Absurdist Mad Men promotions, which the Cultural Gutter participates in and even encourages. Duck Phillips rules an undersea advertizing empire and “Pete feels slighted.”

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    Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film.

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    Al-Jazeera America profiles John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, a documentary about Cambodian rock’n’roll and musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge. “Until 1975, music thrived in Phnom Penh, with clubs full night after night, crowds gathering in the streets around transistor radios to hear the latest releases, and the biggest stars being feted by the king. Enter the Khmer Rouge, communism and the war on intellectuals. Between 1975 and 1979, about 2 million Cambodians, roughly a third of the population, were rounded up and either were killed or died of starvation. Artists were particularly disliked by the Khmer Rouge, which saw creativity as decadence: Almost all of the biggest names perished during that era.”

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