The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

RIP, Louis Jourdan

Actor Louis Jourdan has died. Jourdan starred in both films and television including, Gigi (1958), Letter From An Unknown Woman (1948), Swamp Thing (1982), Octopussy (1983), Madame Bovary (1949), Julie (1956), Columbo (1978), Paris Precinct (1955) and Dracula (1977). The BBC, The Guardian and The New York Times have obituaries. Here’s a brief interview with […]

“Bad News: Universal Is ‘Re-Imagining’ Its Classic Monsters”

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At The Telegraph, Anne Billson shares the bad news about Universal’s “reimagining” its classic monsters, the problem with big budget horror, and filmmakers who don’t get horror. “Another problem is that upmarket film-makers who have built their reputations in more prestigious genres just don’t “get” horror, so when they deign to make a horror movie, […]

“Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula”

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The 1980 BBC Radio dramatization of “Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula; or, The Adventure of the Sanguinary Count” is now available on YouTube, which is nice since it is no longer available on the Internet Archive. Like this:Like Loading…

Engulfed by the Shadow of Dracula

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“Beware that his shadow does not engulf you like a daemonic nightmare.” Of Vampyres, Terrible Phantoms and the Seven Deadly Sins (Nosferatu, 1922) “All three had brilliant white teeth that shone like pearls against the ruby of their voluptuous lips. There was something about them that made me uneasy, some longing and at the same […]

RIP, Carla Laemmle

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Actor and dancer Carla Laemmle has died. She appeared in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), Dracula (1931) and The Broadway Melody (1929). Laemmle returned to film with The Vampire Hunters Club (2001).  The New York Times, The Hollywood Reporter and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. Here Laemmle is interviewed by her niece. And […]

RIP, Francis Matthews

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Actor Francis Matthews has died. Matthews voiced Captain Scarlet in the Supermarionation adventure show Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-8). He also appeared in Hammer horror films The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), Dracula, Prince of Darkness (1966) and Rasputin, The Mad Monk (1966) and as the suave detective, Paul Temple in the eponymous television series. […]

The Gothic Imagination

BBC Radio 4 presents dramatizations of Frankenstein and Dracula, as well as extras including discussions of the difficulty of performing Frankenstein’s Creature, Vitalism, and who Stoker might’ve based his Count on. Click through to The Gothic Imagination. (via @booksadventures) Like this:Like Loading…

A Warning to the faint of heart
And eight year olds

When I was in grade two, my school thought it’d be a great Halloween activity to have a movie screening of old horror films. They showed us the 1931 adaptations of Dracula and Frankenstein, the original 1932 The Mummy, and the 1954 3-D classic, The Creature from the Black Lagoon. At age eight I had […]

Summer Fun Time Reading ’12

Summer’s come early this year, with the hum of air conditioners and fans in the air and the grass peacefully brown beneath my feet, the fireflies rising into the trees and all around the internet, Summer Top Ten lists are in bloom, from the Top Ten YA Summer Reads to the Top Ten Summer Eggplant Recipes […]

RIP, Gene Colan

Comics artist Gene Colan has died.  He was best known for his work on Marvel’s The Tomb of Dracula, but he started at DC drawing Namor, the Sub-Mariner and worked with Steve Gerber on Howard the Duck.  The Guardian has an obituary with more on his life and career. Like this:Like Loading…

A Study in Emerald

Neil Gaiman’s tale of Lovecraftian horror is available as a PDF download of the “daily newspaper for all classes,” The Star of Albion–including ads for such things as “Jekyll Powders.” Like this:Like Loading…

Dracula: Sovereign of the Damned

Comics Alliance’s Chris Sims provides a link to the anime version of Tomb of Dracula and his own running commentary on things like, Dracula’s light up fangs and stealing the Devil’s girlfriend. Like this:Like Loading…

The Grave of Bela Lugosi

Today is Bela Lugosi’s birthday. Happy Birthday, Bela!  J. W. Ocker writes about Bela’s perfection as a vampire and about the sadness of his grave. Like this:Like Loading…

The United Monster Talent Agency

Movietone News: The United Monster Talent Agency helps bring monsters to a screen near you! Like this:Like Loading…

A Century of Cinematic Horror

Decade by decade, the Movie Morlocks look at 100 years of cinematic horror, starting with the 1910 silent, Frankenstein. Like this:Like Loading…

Universal’s Years of Terror and Longing!

Beware the stalking half-human half beast!  Cursed with the thirst for human blood, unconscionable hubris,  and demanding a mate, the Monster Legacy site comes to life and walks among us! (as part of promotion for The Wolf Man remake). Thrills! Shock! Suspense! Like this:Like Loading…

Ghostly Voices from the Past

Old Time Radio has a collection of old horror shows just in time for Halloween.  You can find the Mercury Theater of the Air’s “War of the Worlds” and “Dracula,” a collection of Australian Frankenstein shows and some Dark Fantasy, too. Aren’t you glad they aren’t “spooktacular” or “fangtastic?” Like this:Like Loading…

Herbie Popnecker, Reviewed

At Chris’ Invincible Super-Blog, Chris attempts to review the one where Dracula throws Herbie Popnecker into a pizza oven. Like this:Like Loading…

Good Santo, Bad Santo, No Santo at all

Curious about lucha movies but don’t know where to start? Todd from Die, Danger, Die, Die, Kill! is here to help out with good movies starring Santo (here and here), good movies with no Santo and some Santo movies “likely to make you want to tear out your own brain and scrub it with industrial […]

ONE TRILLION AND ONE LEANING TOWERS

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1. Overture IslandOn December 4, 2008, the future ended. The event that marked its end was the death of a 92-year old man from the not uncommon cause of heart failure. It would not have been an epoch-ending event save for one detail: the man’s name was Forest J Ackerman. Like this:Like Loading…

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Ashlee Blackwell considers Jonathan Demme’s Beloved as a horror film as part of their Black History & Women In Horror Month series. “Beloved takes us on one journey of the Black American experience of slavery through the body of a Black female protagonist.”

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    Watch Nigerian writer and director Nosa Igbinedion’s Oya: The Coming Of The Orishas here.

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    At Bitch Media, Sara Century wonders why Michonne isn’t in charge and considers which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: comics or tv. “As I was thinking about the numerous questionable writing choices made with these could-be-so-great female characters, I got to wondering, which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: the TV show or the comic? In other words, which one is less sexist?

    I wrote up a short list of the main female characters that appear both on the show and in the comic to decipher the differences in how these women are written. These descriptions contain spoilers through season five of the TV show, because it’s impossible to write about The Walking Dead without talking about how people die all the time.”

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    Vixen Varsity shares Olufemi Lee-Johnson’s tribute to Milestone Media and Dwayne McDuffie. “For the first time in my life, I was around comic writers of color telling stories that mirror or surpassed the storylines of America’s favorite heroes. Icon dealt with being the ultimate immigrant and not understanding current black culture. Rocket (Raquel Irvin) was his guide, but also aspired to be more than just a woman in the projects. Static (Virgil Hawkins) was just a normal teenager dealing with fitting into school and then was put into this extraordinary circumstance of being a hero. Hardware (Curtis Metcalf) wanted respect from his mentor, but later learned about the bigger picture when it came to being a hero and the characters from Blood Syndicate…they were just trying to make it day by day and maintain their respect as a gang.”

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    At Soundcheck, John Schaefer talks with Jim Jarmusch about “making music for someone else’s films, and a penchant for walking the tightrope between narrative and abstract art in his own movies. And if you thought his C.V. was looking a little thin, Jarmusch is also working on an upcoming opera about the Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla, with Robert Wilson and composer Phil Kline.” (Thanks, Kate!)

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    Alex Deuben interviews artist Nate Powell about the second volume of The March and working with Rep. John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. “We are taught — and we tend to perpetuate this myth — that the Civil Rights Movement was nine words long: ‘Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, I Have a Dream.’ I think what you’re saying really backs up that notion. In terms of John Lewis’ personal journey, ‘Book Two’ is certainly a deepening of discovery and involvement. Not just a worldview broadening, but becoming much more personally aware of the counter-escalation to any progress that the Movement made.”

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