The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Wolves In The Speakeasy

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Speakeasy Radio hosted an tweetalong of The Company Of Wolves followed by a short podcast where Prof. Kate Laity, Ms. Angela Englert and the Gutter’s own Carol discuss the film, author Angela Carter and werewolves. Listen to the episode of Speakeasy Radio here and see all the tweets here. Like this:Like Loading…

Neko Ramen Taisho: Finding Your Own Way

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Minoru Kawasaki’s Neko Ramen Taisho (2008) is the classic story of a son trying to prove himself to his father and his father’s desire to recreate his son in his own image. Except Taisho, aka William Thomas Jefferson III, is a cat who makes ramen, and his father, William Thomas Jefferson II, is a “cat […]

“The Bitter Tears of the Private Detective”

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At Multiglom, Anne Billson writes about Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes and “The Bitter Tears of the Private Detective.” Last week I went to see Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes again. And once again, as I dabbed my eyes with a hanky, I was intrigued and beguiled by the […]

“Speaking In Tongues”

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At Chhotahazri, Trisha Gupta considers why people resist subtitled films. “I see subtitles as giving me access to a world I wouldn’t otherwise enter – but like a polite, well-spoken guide, providing commentary unobtrusively, not drowning out the voices of the locals.” (via @bethlovesbolly) Like this:Like Loading…

On The Media: True Crime

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On The Media dedicates an hour to the true crime genre. Like this:Like Loading…

“A History of Race in Science Fiction Films”

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Graveyard Shift Sisters reviews Adilifu Nama’s Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film and looks at the history of race in science fiction films from teh 1950s to the present. “Adilifu Nama concocted a thorough read that blends a critical look at science fiction cinema’s milestone works in conjunction with American sociopolitical history, specifically […]

“Kongo (1935): Apocalypse Then”

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There’s a fine piece at Nitrate Diva about the 1935 film, Kongo. “In this monument to morbidity, nearly all the taboos festering at the edges of pre-Code cinema come out and play: blasphemy, drug addiction, prostitution, torture, slavery, bestiality, and (spoiler alert!) incest. The movie positively wallows in depravity. Degradation is its subject, its project, […]

“Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”

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At Hyperallergic, Jeremy Polacek writes about the history of Afrofuturism and the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s exhibit, “Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”:  “Afrofuturism is an empowering rubric, an approach and aesthetic that clarifies and connects history and the hope, creativity, and pain there within. Afrofuturism is wry, wise, and leveling — it believes that a brighter, more […]

Absolute Beginners ’86

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When Julien Temple’s Absolute Beginners was released in 1986 it was met with general indifference and some critical dismissals. While the film may have some problems, today its reputation seems to be clouded by the misconception that it single-handedly ruined the prestigious British film studio Goldcrest and was universally panned. Neither of these assumptions is […]

Logan’s Run at The Projection Booth

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Our friends at the Projection Booth watch Logan’s Run and they interview authors of the original novel, William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson. Listen here. Like this:Like Loading…

The Great Filmi Comedy Uncle Bracket!

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The final four have been selected in the Great Filmi Comedy Uncle Bracket and you still have a chance to vote. Representing Classic Hindi film, Johny Walker takes on Johny Lever, winner of the Hindi Film 1995-2015 bracket. Representing the South, Brahmanandan takes on Wild Card winner Shammi Kapoor. Learn more about each contender and […]

Motion in Akira Kurosawa’s Films

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Every Frame A Painting returns to analysis of Akira Kurosawa’s work. Like this:Like Loading…

Seijun Suzuki’s Story of Sorrow and Sadness

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“Commercial cinema has predictably chosen not to bite the hand that feeds it, so it’s simultaneously inspiring and also kind of embarrassing to see a movie like Seijun Suzuki’s Story of Sorrow and Sadness. Rarely has a mainstream commercial release been as rabid in its attack, and as thoughtful in its critique, of our dystopian […]

“The 100 Best Bollywood Films”

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Time Out London shares its list of the 100 best Bollywood films–including selections by friend of the Gutter, Beth Watkins of Beth Loves Bollywood. (See the 10 films she selected and wrote about in the greater list here). Like this:Like Loading…

“Keanu Reeves, I’m Sorry I Doubted You”

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At Multiglom, film critic Anne Bilson apologizes to Keanu Reeves: “Keanu Reeves, I must apologise. For years, like other film critics, I cast aspersions on your acting talent, belittled your intellect, and cracked jokes about your name, which means ‘cool breeze over the mountains’ in Hawaiian. Only now do I realise I was foolish and […]

RIP, Leonard Nimoy

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Actor, director, writer and artist Leonard Nimoy has died. Nimoy was most famous for playing Spock in Star Trek, but he also appeared in Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), In Search Of…, Ancient Mysteries, Columbo, Fringe, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Faerie Tale Theatre, Mission: Impossible, Dragnet and Bonanza.  Nimoy directed Three Men And A […]

Interview with Jim Jarmusch

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At Soundcheck, John Schaefer talks with Jim Jarmusch about “making music for someone else’s films, and a penchant for walking the tightrope between narrative and abstract art in his own movies. And if you thought his C.V. was looking a little thin, Jarmusch is also working on an upcoming opera about the Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla, with Robert Wilson and composer […]

RIP, Lizabeth Scott

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Actor Lizabeth Scott has died. Scott appeared in film and film and television including, The Strange Loves of Martha Ivers (1946), Dead Reckoning (1947), I Walk Alone (1948), The Company She Keeps (1951), Loving You (1957) and The Third Man tv series.  The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times and The Guardian have obituaries. […]

Learning from Akira Kurosawa and Stanley Kubrick

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Tony Zhou looks at “The Geometry of a Scene” in Akira Kurosawa’s The Bad Sleep Well and Domus looks at Stanley Kubrick’s use of one-point perspective. (Make sure to watch Tony Zhou’s other video essays in his Every Frame A Painting series). Like this:Like Loading…

Turkish Flash Gordon

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At Neon Harbor’s Deja View, Ed Glaser shares the history of Turkish Flash Gordon, “Baytekin Fezada Çarpışanlar.” Watch and see “perhaps the most outrageous monster ever committed to film” and find out whether Earthlings are the best kissers. Like this:Like Loading…

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Speakeasy Radio hosted an tweetalong of The Company Of Wolves followed by a short podcast where Prof. Kate Laity, Ms. Angela Englert and the Gutter’s own Carol discuss the film, author Angela Carter and werewolves. Listen to the episode of Speakeasy Radio here and see all the tweets here.

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    At Terrible Minds, Chuck Wendig writes about Mad Max: Fury Road and Game of Thrones. “So, two very popular storyworlds. Two portrayals of a world where women hold dubious power and are seen as ‘things.’ One of these is roundly criticized for it. One of them is roundly celebrated for it. Game of Thrones catches hell for its portrayal of women and this subject. Mad Max is wreathed in a garland of bike chains and hubcabs for it. What, then, is the difference? Let’s try to suss it out.”

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    Friend of the Gutter, Kate Laity writes about medieval settings, ideas of heroism and masculinity, and “how people use history to veil the way they think about how things are now.”

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    Comics Alliance has a gallery of supervillains in the style of Eighties album art by Rocky Davies.

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    The sounds of failing hard drives. (via @wfmu)

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    Drive-In Mob has a variety of tremendous ringtones from In Like Flint‘s Derek Flint speaking porpoise to the Wilhelm Scream as well as other shenanigans like a club mix  and “Sissy Goforth and The Seven Dwarf’s Yodel Song”  created from Boom (1968). Drive-In Mob, it’s the shock of being alive. (The Cultural Gutter is a proud host of the weekly Drive-In Mob movie tweetalong).

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