The Cultural Gutter

going through pop culture's trash since 2003

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Interview with Park Joon-Hung

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

A House Based on Biogenetic Forms

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Behold the creepily organic splendor of Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez’ design for a house.  “Organic louvred panels incorporated into the building’s skin open and close like gills, while other openings stretch and widen to adjust the amount of light entering the interior.”

Roger Corman on Edgar Allan Poe

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Roger Corman talks with the British Film Institute about Edgar Allan Poe and his film adaptations of Poe’s works.

RIP, Kate O’Mara

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor Kate O’Mara has died. She performed the Rani in Doctor Who, Caress Morell in Dynasty, Mademoiselle Perrodot in The Vampire Lovers and Alys in The Horror of Frankenstein. O’Mara also had roles in Absolutely Fabulous, The Avengers, The Saint, Danger Man / Secret Agent, The Persuaders and Adam Adamant Lives!  The Guardian, Digital Spy […]

RIP, Lorenzo Semple

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Screenwriter and creator of the Sixties Batman television series Lorenzo Semple has died. Besides Batman, Gutter readers might know Semple best from his screenplays for, The Parallax View, Flash Gordon (1980), Papillon, The Drowning Pool, Never Say Never Again, Sheena, and King Kong (1976). The Los Angeles Times,  The Hollywood Reporter and Comics Alliance have […]

RIP, Dave Brockie

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Gwar lead singer Dave Brockie has died. Rolling Stone, LA Weekly, and NPR have obituaries. Metal Insider has an excerpt from No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes about one Gwar’s performances at Grey Gardens. Friend of the Gutter, Robert Mitchell interviewed Brockie in 2008. Oderus Urungus reads Goodnight, Moon.

RIP, James Rebhorn

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor James Rebhorn has died. The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and The Hollywood Reporter have obituaries. Rebhorn had roles in films including Independence Day, Basic Instinct, The Talented Mr. Ripley and He Knows You’re Alone. And he had roles in television shows including, Search for Tomorrow, Guiding Light, As The World Turns, […]

“Indian Comics Beyond Balloons and Panels”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Alok Sharma spent five years finding creators of Indian comics for his documentary, Chitrakatha: Indian Comics Beyond Balloons and Panels. Check out all the resources at the film’s website and this ten minutes of footage from the film.  There’s also an older news story about the film at The New Indian Express. (Thanks, Aseem Chandaver) […]

RIP, Věra Chytilová

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Czech filmmaker Věra Chytilová has died. She was a central director in the Czech New Wave in the 1960s and is probably best known for her film, Daisies (1966). The Prague Post, The Houston Chronicle, The AV Club and The New York Times have obituaries. Fresques has an interview with Chytilová.

Fan Theorizing and True Detective

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“Fan-crafted theorizing is fun enough – it’s a solid way to keep up audience engagement over a show’s run and even inject excitement into series that might be flailing on its own (see: that horrifying “dead mother” theory that’s been circulating amongst How I Met Your Mother fans, which is either entirely insane or decidedly […]

“10 Modern Heroes of Black Nerddom (and Urkel is NOT One)”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“If the RZA didn’t exist, then we would have had to invent him.” Charles Webb shares his list of “10 Modern Heroes of Black Nerddom (and Urkel is NOT One)” at Topless Robot.

Interview with Jeopardy! Winner Arthur Chu

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The AV Club has an interview with Jeopardy! Champion, Arthur Chu, in which he discusses strategizing to win the game show, public personas and how the show is made.  

RIP, Harold Ramis

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor, writer and director Harold Ramis has died. He is probably best known for  SCTV, Animal House, Meatballs, Stripes, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters II, and Groundhog Day. He also had memorable roles in As Good As It Gets and Knocked Up.  The Chicago Tribune, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. The […]

Vic Armstrong on Buster Keaton

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Stunt performer Vic Armstrong talks about the stunt work of Buster Keaton. (via Graham Wynd)

Interview with Lady Pink

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Tim Maughan shares the transript of his interview with Lady Pink. “It was mainly inspired by a visit to the press preview of The Museum of New York City’s City as Canvas exhibit, where I was lucky enough to get to talk to a few bona fide legends of the NYC graffiti movement, and in […]

Interview with Denys Cowan

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“Legendary comic book artist and Milestone Media co-founder Denys Cowan joined CBR executive producer Jonah Weiland in the CBR Speakeasy for a lengthy discussion covering Cowan’s career, diversity, and the current state of Milestone properties at DC Comics. They begin by discussing Cowan’s seminal work on The Question with Dennis O’Neil and the mistakes he […]

RIP, Sid Caesar

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Comedian, actor and writer Sid Caesar has died. The New York Times and Variety have obituaries. Time has gathered clips of his work. The Archive of American Television has an interview with Caesar here.

RIP, Shirley Temple

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actress and Ambassador Shirley Temple Black has died. The New York Times and The Guardian have obituaries.  She got her start in “Baby Burlesks” went on to make many, many films, become the US Ambassador to the United Nations, Ghana and Czechoslovakia, the first female US Chief of Protocol, as well as an early activist for […]

RIP, Stuart Hall

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Sociologist and Cultural Theorist Stuart Hall has died.  The Guardian and Art Review have obituaries.  At Flavorwire, Brie Hiramina writes, “Why Stuart Hall’s Groundbreaking Work On Culture And Identity Still Matters.”  There is an interview with Hall at Radical Philosophy.  You can watch a documentary about Stuart Hall, The Stuart Hall Project, here.

Nettrice Gaskins Explores AfroFuturism In Virtual Worlds

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At IAfroFuturism, Ytasha interviews Nettrice Gaskins about AfroFuturism, art, math, science and virtual worlds. “I had to figure out how to immerse those who weren’t familiar with Afrofuturism using the virtual space. I wanted the avatars in the space to have an experience. I put up a gallery that allowed you to manipulate objects. I […]

keep looking »
  • The Book!

  • Support The Gutter

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Tin House has published an edition of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness illustrated by Matt Kish, an interesting follow-up to Kish’s project, Moby-Dick In Pictures; One Drawing For Every Page. See more of Kish’s work here.

    ~

    At Salon, Matt Ashby and Brendan Carroll write about irony and cynicism, sincerity and honesty in art: “At one time, irony served to challenge the establishment; now it is the establishment. The art of irony has turned into ironic art. Irony for irony’s sake. A smart aleck making bomb noises in front of a city in ruins. But irony without a purpose enables cynicism. It stops at disavowal and destruction, fearing strong conviction is a mark of simplicity and delusion.

    ~

    Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

    ~

    Get ready for a new season of Mad Men with this collection of Absurdist Mad Men promotions, which the Cultural Gutter participates in and even encourages. Duck Phillips rules an undersea advertizing empire and “Pete feels slighted.”

    ~

    Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film.

    ~

    Al-Jazeera America profiles John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, a documentary about Cambodian rock’n’roll and musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge. “Until 1975, music thrived in Phnom Penh, with clubs full night after night, crowds gathering in the streets around transistor radios to hear the latest releases, and the biggest stars being feted by the king. Enter the Khmer Rouge, communism and the war on intellectuals. Between 1975 and 1979, about 2 million Cambodians, roughly a third of the population, were rounded up and either were killed or died of starvation. Artists were particularly disliked by the Khmer Rouge, which saw creativity as decadence: Almost all of the biggest names perished during that era.”

    ~

  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.

    -------

  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: