The Cultural Gutter

taking the dumb out of fandom

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

RIP, Jan Hooks

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Actor and comedian Jan Hooks has died. The New Yorker has an appreciation. Kevin Nealon remembers Hooks at People.com. DListed remembers Hooks. The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and The Hollywood Reporter have obituaries. Time collected six of her Saturday Night Live sketches. Hooks talks about life after SNL. Here she is as […]

RIP, Geoffrey Holder

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Actor, dancer, choreographer, director, designer and artist Geoffrey Holder has died. Besides his iconic role as Baron Samedi in Live And Let Die (1973), he directed and designed the costumes for the 1975 stage production of The Wiz, performed as the Metropolitan Opera Ballet’s principal dancer in 1955-6, choreographed pieces for the Holder Dance Company […]

Interview with Pendleton Ward

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Rolling Stone‘s Neill Strauss profiles Adventure Time creature Pendleton Ward and talks to him about why he decided to stop running the show. “He sighs and looks down at his stomach. ‘It’s nice to just be sleepy and make stuff,’ he says. ‘That’s the root of what I like doing. Make stuff on my own […]

Interview with Michael Keaton

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Tom Chiarella conducts an Esquire interview with Michael Keaton interesting in both form and content: “Keaton. On the versions and versions and versions of himself. Glib young man, mook, weird spook, superhero, villain, operative, hitman, guy with a parakeet on his shoulder, corporate shill, and ex-superhero. He never got caught in any one. How?”

“The Big Idea: In Conversation with LULZSEC”

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The Royal Court Theatre hosts a conversation among former Anonymous LulzSec members facilitated by anthropologist Gabriella Coleman.

Kevin Weir’s Haunting Images

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Photographer Kevin Weir uses vintage photographs to create haunting animation in “The Flux Machine.” The Guardian has an interview with Weir and more on his work.

Interview with Alison Bechdel

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NPR interviews cartoonist Alison Bechdel on the occasion of her MacArthur Genius Grant. “I guess I’m proudest of just really sticking with this odd thing I loved and was good at — drawing comics about marginal people (lesbians) in a marginal format (comics). I never thought much about whether that was responsible, or respectable, or […]

Mark D. White Talks About Captain America

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At We Are Respectable Negroes, Chauncey Devega interviews friend of the Gutter Mark D. White about the virtues of Captain America. “In this, the ninth episode, of the second season of WARN’s podcast series, we talk about what comic books and superheroes can tell us about philosophy and politics, work through what makes someone ‘heroic,’ […]

“A Blend of Fact and Interpretation of Fact”: An Interview with Dave McKean

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Every fall I write for the official Midnight Madness and Vanguard program blogs of the Toronto International Film Festival. And I usually try to find a guest writer to cover me here at the Gutter, write a piece ahead of time or even, sometimes, just totally wander out of  my assigned comics domain to write […]

Interview with Director Ringo Lam

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At Kaiju Shakedown, Hiroshi Fukazawa interviews director Ringo Lam. “Not as flashy as John Woo, never as hyperkinetic as Tsui Hark, Ringo Lam is one of Hong Kong’s most underappreciated directors. He made his name with sophisticated, downbeat crime dramas that came to define a certain style of urban Hong Kong cinema in the Eighties […]

Interview with Filmmaker Peter Strickland

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The Gutter’s own Carol interviews Peter Strickland (Berberian Sound Studio; The Duke of Burgundy) about his films, sound design, mole crickets, pheromonal perfume and the pressure to put on a persona. Read it at the Toronto International Film Festival’s official Vanguard Program blog.

RIP, Stan Goldberg

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Comic Artist Stan Goldberg has died. Best known for his work on Archie Comics, Goldberg also worked for Marvel and DC. He drew romance comics including Patsy Walker and Millie the Model. He worked on Archie Meets The Punisher. And recently he drew Nancy Drew and the Clue Drew.  Comic Book Resources, The Comics Beat […]

Haruki Murakami on his Writing

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The Guardian has collected some responses Haruki Murakami gave to reader questions at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. “I don’t have any idea at all, when I start writing, of what is to come. For instance, for The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, the first thing I had was the call of the bird, because I heard […]

RIP, Lauren Bacall

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Actor Lauren Bacall has died. Bacall is most famous for work with her first husband Humphrey Bogart, To Have And Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946) and Key Largo (1948), but she also starred in Douglas Sirk’s classic melodrama Written On The Wind (1956), co-starred with Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable in How To […]

RIP, Menahem Golan

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Producer and director Menahem Golan has died. Golan produced (and sometimes wrote and directed) many, many films including: The Delta Force (1986), Death Wish (1974), The Apple (1980), The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), Missing In Action (1984), Invasion U.S.A. (1985), American Ninja (1985), Lifeforce (1985), Cobra (1986), Masters of the Universe (1987) Bloodsport (1988), Breakin’ […]

“James Bond Is No Hero To Him”

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Patrick McGoohan talks about Secret Agent (aka, Danger Man) in a .pdf copy of a 1964 TV Guide.

RIP, Robert Drew

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Filmmaker, cinema verité innovator and journalist Robert Drew has died. The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and The Guardian have obituaries. Grantland has a memoriam of his work and life. “Drew died last week. He was 90. His genre was cinema verité, which is a much more artful way into truth. He made portraits […]

Happenings With The Projection Booth?

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What’s happening with The Projection Booth, you ask? This week The Projection Booth watches Caligula (1979) and TPB‘s Mike White is interviewed by Dave Pace at La Politique Psychotronique.

“Sculptress of Sound: The Lost Works of Composer Delia Derbyshire”

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BBC Radio 4’s Matthew Sweet explores the music and life of composer Delia Derbyshire, probably best known for her work on Doctor Who‘s iconic theme song. “Her realisation of the Doctor Who theme is just one small example of her genius and we’ll demonstrate how the music was originally created as well as hearing individual […]

RIP, Margot Adler

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Journalist Margot Adler has died. She is best known for her work as a journalist on NPR, but she also created the speculative fiction radio program, “The Hour Of The Wolf” and was the writer of Drawing Down The Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America Today (1979) and Vampires Are Us: Understanding […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    A gallery of pages from Philippe Druillet’s Nccronomicon. (Via elmatpe and thanks, Steven!)

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    An interactive sculpture of Hanuman made from 26,000 light bells made by Charuvi Design Labs. to promote their film Sri Hanuman Chalisa. Here is a video of the interactive experience. (Thanks, Beth!)

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    At The Daily Beast, Arthur Chu writes about GamerGate, Disco Demolition and Lilith Fair. “The biggest 1970s music bonfire was not done by a church, and the records they destroyed weren’t metal records. And they didn’t use kerosene and a match, they used explosives. And rather than singing hymns and being quietly self-righteous, the event erupted into an orgy of violent rage. I’m talking, of course, about the ill-fated promotion the Chicago White Sox ran on July 12, 1979, known as ‘Disco Demolition Night.’

    Yes, in an era where Christians literally believed rock bands were Satanic cults who used backward masking to hypnotize people, the worst violence against music was wrought by guys who just didn’t like disco.”

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    Actor Elizabeth Peña has died. Peña appeared in both film and television including, La Bamba (1987), Batteries Not Included (1987), Blue Steel (1989), L.A. Law, Lone Star (1996),  The Incredibles (2004), Justice League, Prime Suspect and Modern Family. NPR remembers Peña. The Guardian has collected clips of Peña’s work. Latino Review, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and  The Hollywood Reporter have obituaries.

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    The Book Design Blog has a gallery of Valeria Brancaforte’s hand-printed books.

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    Jake Adelstein has shared an unpublished chapter of his book Tokyo Vice online.  “This chapter never made the final cut of Tokyo Vice because it’s not about crime or the underworld. It is about the battle to tell the truth when it is inconvenient for the powers that be to have it known.  It could probably use some more editing but for those who feel like the Japanese government isn’t telling you the whole truth about the actual environmental damage coming from the Fukushima meltdown–which is still going on–because if they stop pumping in water, nuclear fission will start again, this should help make you even a little more paranoid.  Enjoy.”

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