The Cultural Gutter

going through pop culture's trash since 2003

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

So Much Art

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So much art available for your browsing pleasure as the Smithsonian puts 40,000 pieces of Asian art from the Freer and Saeckler Collection online.

Free Oline Korean Film

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The Korean Film Archive has been uploading classics of Korean cinema to their YouTube channel, Korean Classic Film Theater. Modern Korean Cinema reports on the latest 15 films uploaded.

“The Five Best North Korean Films”

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Simon Fowler shares “The Five Best North Korean Films” at The Guardian. Did Pulgasari make the cut? Is the list Pulgasari five times? Click through to find out. (Thanks, Earl!)

Interview with Park Joon-Hung

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Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

Revenge In South Korean Cinema

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Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film.

Kaiju Shakedown: Redemption

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Driven from its village by cruel Ch’ing officials, Kaiju Shakedown has spent years righting wrongs and secretly training in the world of martial arts. Now Kaiju Shakedown returns to us, using an improved No Shadow Fist to write about Asian cinema at Film Comment.

Best Korean Movies of 2013

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At Modern Korean Cinema, Pierce Conran shares his list of top ten Korean movies in 2013.

Interview with Simon Yam Tat-Wah

PaikJiyeon’s People Inside features Simon Yam in all his sartorial splendor. “Simple, that is the best.” (First of multipart interview)

Clip from The Host 2 / Gwoemul 2

Here’s a clip from Bong Joon-ho’s The Host 2/ Gwoemul 2 (sequel to the 2007 film, The Host / Gwoemul). More river monster + a little behind the scenes look.

Cloud Atlas, Racebending and Racism

Racebending and Hyperallergic discuss the racism and lack of critical response to racism in Cloud Atlas‘ use of “colorblind casting.”  Mike Le responds to the trailer: Ultimately…my belief is that Cloud Atlas will eventually be viewed through the same lens as films like The Good Earth, Birth of a Nation, or even Dumbo. These are films […]

FantAsia Film Festival 2012

The FantAsia site is up and running with many, many trailers to get you ready for the festival. (Or at least, what films to keep an eye out for).

NYAFF 2012!

Who will dare face the New York Asian Film Festival?! Who will dare not to after seeing the festival trailer and reading, “Grady’s Guide to NYAFF 2012?!”  The full festival schedule and ticket information are here.

Discovering Korean Cinema

At Modern Korean Cinema, Pierce Conran writes of discovering Korean film and, in particular, Jang Joon-hwan’s genre-blending, Save The Green Planet.

Interview with Ryoo Seung-Wan

Hangul Cellulloid interviews director, writer and actor, Ryoo Seung-Wan about his earlier films, including Die Bad; his current film, The Unjust; his upcoming, The Berlin File; and whether Korean films are inherently violent.

100 Years of Manhwa

An excellent gallery of images and collections, as well as historical context on 100 years of Korean comics.

Ballerinas Watch Black Swan

The New York Times has a piece on dancers’ reaction to Black Swan. Meanwhile, Jonathan Romney interviews Darren Aronofsky and writes: “There’s much steamy weirdness that you don’t normally associate with ballet fictions: hallucinations, horror, lesbian clinches with doppelgängers.” Which is exactly what I associate with them. I’d like to see dancers respond to other […]

Most Anticipated Asian Films of 2011

Wildgrounds breaks down their most anticipated films of 2011.

Let The Bullets Fly

The bullets fly in Weng Jiang’s new Asian Western set in 1920s China:  Let the Bullets Fly.  It stars Chow Yun-Fat, Carina Lau and Weng Jiang himself. And though that sure sounds like Chow Yun-Fat, word is Mr. Chow has been dubbed. It would make a nice double feature with The Good, The Bad, The […]

25 Or 6 To A Better Tomorrow?

This trailer for the Korean remake of John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow has Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4″ going through my head. (thanks, brian!)

Summer Fun Time Reading!

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It’s summertime and all the happenin’ sites have advice about bikinis, manscaping, quick cool meals and reading lists. I have no idea what to tell you about beachwear, other than you do look cute in that, but I do have some reading suggestions.

keep looking »
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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    The Projection Booth watches Night Moves (1975) with special guest host the Gutter’s own Carol. “Arthur Penn’s Night Moves (1975) stars Gene Hackman as Harry Moseby, a private eye trying to find himself in a post-Watergate America. We’re joined by Nat Segaloff, author of Arthur Penn: American Director and Carol Borden of the Cultural Gutter.”

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    At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Ashlee Blackwell considers love in Ganja & Hess. ” It is up to the viewer to map a path that suits their understanding. What writer/director Bill Gunn (who plays Dr. Hess’ assistant) wanted was a disruption of mainstream fare. Gunn didn’t seem too interested in what Hollywood desired, and like many writers, wrote a screenplay that felt personal and needed to be written. It tackles so many themes, it’s almost difficult to begin. While most rely on it being vampiric and about addiction, it’s important to note the journey that Hess and Ganja embark on together. Their romantic entanglement may by one of the most fascinating aspects of the film that is commonly overlooked because it is challenging to simplify.”

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    Friend of the Gutter Less Lee Moore interviews friend of the Gutter Colin Geddes about his work on the new horror streaming service, Shudder.

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    The Bowery Boys Podcast dedicates an episode to New York City in the history of comic books. “In the 1890s a newspaper rivalry between William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer helped bring about the birth of the comic strip and, a few decades later, the comic book.  Today, comic book superheroes are bigger than ever — in blockbuster summer movies and television shows — and most of them still have an inseparable bond with New York City.”

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    Pornokitsch’s One Comic Podcast looks at Red Sonja #10: “To everyone’s surprise, despite some of the covers and the character’s reputation, this isn’t the exploitative boobs’n’swordplay production it could have been. How did it achieve that? Listen and find out.”

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    Los Angeles Magazine has a gallery of self-portraits of Bunny Yeager and a bit about the career of a model and photographer most famous for her pin-up photographs of Bettie Page. “Having dedicated her life to photography and modeling, not to mention publishing 30 books on the subject (one of which shares a name with the Gavlak exhibition), Yeager had an influence on a generation of artist-photographers including Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman. Arbus even went as far to call her ‘The world’s greatest pin-up photographer.'” (Thanks, Stephanie!)

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