The Cultural Gutter

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"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Free Oline Korean Film

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The Korean Film Archive has been uploading classics of Korean cinema to their YouTube channel, Korean Classic Film Theater. Modern Korean Cinema reports on the latest 15 films uploaded. Like this:Like Loading…

“The Five Best North Korean Films”

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Simon Fowler shares “The Five Best North Korean Films” at The Guardian. Did Pulgasari make the cut? Is the list Pulgasari five times? Click through to find out. (Thanks, Earl!) Like this:Like Loading…

Interview with Park Joon-Hung

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Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung. Like this:Like Loading…

Revenge In South Korean Cinema

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Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film. Like this:Like Loading…

Kaiju Shakedown: Redemption

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Driven from its village by cruel Ch’ing officials, Kaiju Shakedown has spent years righting wrongs and secretly training in the world of martial arts. Now Kaiju Shakedown returns to us, using an improved No Shadow Fist to write about Asian cinema at Film Comment. Like this:Like Loading…

Best Korean Movies of 2013

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At Modern Korean Cinema, Pierce Conran shares his list of top ten Korean movies in 2013. Like this:Like Loading…

Interview with Simon Yam Tat-Wah

PaikJiyeon’s People Inside features Simon Yam in all his sartorial splendor. “Simple, that is the best.” (First of multipart interview) Like this:Like Loading…

Clip from The Host 2 / Gwoemul 2

Here’s a clip from Bong Joon-ho’s The Host 2/ Gwoemul 2 (sequel to the 2007 film, The Host / Gwoemul). More river monster + a little behind the scenes look. Like this:Like Loading…

Cloud Atlas, Racebending and Racism

Racebending and Hyperallergic discuss the racism and lack of critical response to racism in Cloud Atlas‘ use of “colorblind casting.”  Mike Le responds to the trailer: Ultimately…my belief is that Cloud Atlas will eventually be viewed through the same lens as films like The Good Earth, Birth of a Nation, or even Dumbo. These are films […]

FantAsia Film Festival 2012

The FantAsia site is up and running with many, many trailers to get you ready for the festival. (Or at least, what films to keep an eye out for). Like this:Like Loading…

NYAFF 2012!

Who will dare face the New York Asian Film Festival?! Who will dare not to after seeing the festival trailer and reading, “Grady’s Guide to NYAFF 2012?!”  The full festival schedule and ticket information are here. Like this:Like Loading…

Discovering Korean Cinema

At Modern Korean Cinema, Pierce Conran writes of discovering Korean film and, in particular, Jang Joon-hwan’s genre-blending, Save The Green Planet. Like this:Like Loading…

Interview with Ryoo Seung-Wan

Hangul Cellulloid interviews director, writer and actor, Ryoo Seung-Wan about his earlier films, including Die Bad; his current film, The Unjust; his upcoming, The Berlin File; and whether Korean films are inherently violent. Like this:Like Loading…

100 Years of Manhwa

An excellent gallery of images and collections, as well as historical context on 100 years of Korean comics. Like this:Like Loading…

Ballerinas Watch Black Swan

The New York Times has a piece on dancers’ reaction to Black Swan. Meanwhile, Jonathan Romney interviews Darren Aronofsky and writes: “There’s much steamy weirdness that you don’t normally associate with ballet fictions: hallucinations, horror, lesbian clinches with doppelgängers.” Which is exactly what I associate with them. I’d like to see dancers respond to other […]

Most Anticipated Asian Films of 2011

Wildgrounds breaks down their most anticipated films of 2011. Like this:Like Loading…

Let The Bullets Fly

The bullets fly in Weng Jiang’s new Asian Western set in 1920s China:  Let the Bullets Fly.  It stars Chow Yun-Fat, Carina Lau and Weng Jiang himself. And though that sure sounds like Chow Yun-Fat, word is Mr. Chow has been dubbed. It would make a nice double feature with The Good, The Bad, The […]

25 Or 6 To A Better Tomorrow?

This trailer for the Korean remake of John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow has Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4″ going through my head. (thanks, brian!) Like this:Like Loading…

Summer Fun Time Reading!

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It’s summertime and all the happenin’ sites have advice about bikinis, manscaping, quick cool meals and reading lists. I have no idea what to tell you about beachwear, other than you do look cute in that, but I do have some reading suggestions. Like this:Like Loading…

NYAFF 2010

The New York Asian Film Festival is coming up and actors Sammo Hung and Simon Yam will be in attending their films Kung Fu Chefs, Bodyguards and Assassins, Echoes of the Rainbow and Eastern Condors. But even if you can’t make it, it’s worth checking out the films and trailers for the Hong Kong/China and […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Comics Alliance suggests seven Star Wars comics to read before Disney makes them disappear. (Including a comic by one of Comics Editor Carol’s favorite creative teams–Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman). “Starting in 2015, Disney’s handing the publishing of any and all new Star Wars comics over to Marvel Comics, with an all new, optimized-for-corporate-synergy canon that will spread across all their media platforms. Anything that’s not a movie (especially one of the Original Trilogy movies), or a Clone Wars cartoon, will be unceremoniously Order 66-ed out of existence, giving future filmmakers a clean-ish slate to make movies (and money) on. But what about all those Dark Horse comics? That’s where we come in with 7 Dark Horse Star Wars comics you should track down before they disappear.”

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    At the New York Observer, Ashley Steves writes about Craig Ferguson’s The Late, Late Show. “No one could ever prepare you for watching an episode of Ferguson’s Late Late Show. A friend could not sit you down and explain it (“Well, it’s really meta and deconstructive and there’s a horse”). There was really no good way to recommend it. It was something you discovered and became a part of. You had to stumble upon it on your own, perhaps restless or bored or simply curious while flipping through channels when your eye quickly caught some of the madness. And that’s the best part. It was an unexpected gift. At its worst, it could still send you to bed grinning and comforted. At its best, it was art. It was silly and fun and truly not like any other late night show.”

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    At Comics Alliance, Chris Sims interviews Ed Brubaker about his work on Batman, Gotham Central and Catwoman. “When I look back at [Catwoman], I’m so proud of the first 25 issues of that book, when I felt like everything was firing on all cylinders. I probably should’ve left when Cameron Stewart left instead of sticking around. That’s one of those things I look back at and think “Ah, I had a perfect run up until then!” (Incidentally, Comics Editor Carol’s first piece for the Gutter was about Brubaker’s first 25 issues of Catwoman).

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    At Sequential Art, Greg Carpenter writes a lovely piece about Charles Schulz’ Peanuts. “After only two installments, Schulz had solidified the rules for his comic strip.  Random acts of cruelty would punctuate this irrational world, and Schulz’s trapped little adults would be forced to act out simulations of human behavior, using hollow gestures to try to create meaning in a universe where no other meaning was evident.  If Shakespeare’s Macbeth had been a cartoonist, the results of his daily grind, “tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow,” might have looked somewhat similar—each character a “poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage” until he or she was heard from no more.”

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    The Smithsonian Magazine has a gallery of US spy satellite launches. “Just as NASA creates specially designed patches for each mission into space, [National Reconnaissance Office] follows that tradition for its spy satellite launches. But while NASA patches tend to feature space ships and American flags, NRO prefers wizards, Vikings, teddy bears and the all-seeing eye. With these outlandish designs, a civilian would be justified in wondering if NRO is trolling.”

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    At The Guardian, Keith Stuart and Steve Boxer look at the history of PlayStation.“Having been part of the late 80s rave and underground-clubbing scene, I recognised how it was influencing the youth market. In the early 90s, club culture started to become more mass market, but the impetus was still coming from the underground, from key individuals and tribes. What it showed me was that you had to identify and build relationships with those opinion-formers – the DJs, the music industry, the fashion industry, the underground media.” (via @timmaughan)

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