The Cultural Gutter

dangerous because it has a philosophy

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

RIP, Dave Brockie

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Gwar lead singer Dave Brockie has died. Rolling Stone, LA Weekly, and NPR have obituaries. Metal Insider has an excerpt from No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes about one Gwar’s performances at Grey Gardens. Friend of the Gutter, Robert Mitchell interviewed Brockie in 2008. Oderus Urungus reads Goodnight, Moon.

Disco! Disco! Disco! Disco! Yeah!

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The Gutter’s own Carol was invited to watch and discuss the 1983 Bollywood classic, Disco Dancer, with Beth at Beth Loves Bollywood as part of the Mysterious Order Of The Skeleton Suit‘s Swap-a-thon. See pictures, read a report and listen here. (Carol also has a little about it here).

“On the Notion of Guilty Pleasures”

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“As much as you think ‘We Built This City (On Rock And Roll)’ or Spandau Ballet might be bad, you don’t even know bad, buddy.’” Jon Hunt writes about guilty pleasures, critical faculties,  good and bad music, but his thoughts can easily be applied to other mediums. (via @popshifter)

“10 Modern Heroes of Black Nerddom (and Urkel is NOT One)”

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“If the RZA didn’t exist, then we would have had to invent him.” Charles Webb shares his list of “10 Modern Heroes of Black Nerddom (and Urkel is NOT One)” at Topless Robot.

Fun! Charm! Thrilling Adventure!

AmeliaP

The Thrilling Adventure Hour is a beacon in a grittily realistic, grimdark pop culture landscape, one guiding lost souls to fun, charm and adventure. And I’m glad to see The Thrilling Adventure Hour adapted from podcast radio play into graphic novel because I like what it portends for fun stories in the future and because […]

RIP, Shirley Temple

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Actress and Ambassador Shirley Temple Black has died. The New York Times and The Guardian have obituaries.  She got her start in “Baby Burlesks” went on to make many, many films, become the US Ambassador to the United Nations, Ghana and Czechoslovakia, the first female US Chief of Protocol, as well as an early activist for […]

Mamoru Samuragochi & The Mystery Composer

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Composer Mamoru Samuragochi has issued a statement through his lawyer admitting that another composer has been writing his work. “Samuragochi is perhaps best know for his work in the video game industry, where he worked on notable titles like Resident Evil and Onimusha. It was while composing the score for the latter, in 1999, that […]

RIP, Suchitra Sen

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Actor Suchitra Sen has died. Sen starred in both Bengali and Hindi films (Aandhi; Devdas) and is probably most famous for her roles opposite Uttam Kumar, including Sharey Chuattar; Agni Pariksha; and, Saptapadi. The Times of India, Firstpost Bollywood, and The Indian Express have obituaries. The Times of India also has a video tribute and […]

RIP, Sheila Guyse

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Actor and singer Sheila Guyse has died. Guyse appeared on Broadway, most notably in “Finian’s Rainbow” and in “race films” with all-African-American casts catering to African-American audiences in the 1940s and 1950s. The New York Times has an obituary. Nina Mae McKinney has a tribute to Guyse. Here Sheila Guyse performs “Cinderella” with Billy Daniels […]

RIP, Hal Sutherland

Animator, director, Filmation co-founder and painter Hal Sutherland has died. Sutherland is probably best known for Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, The Archies and Star Trek animated series. Sutherland  Indiewire has an obituary.  StarTrek.com remembers Sutherland. StarTrek.com has a two-part interview with Sutherland here.

RIP, Dave Madden

Actor and comedian Dave Madden has died. He was best known for his portrayal of Reuben Kincaid in the television series, The Partridge Family and his work on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh In.  The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. Here Madden appears after Charo on Sammy Davis Jr.’s Hollywood Palace.

“Where Space Pyramids and Politics Collide”

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“Afrofuturism also goes beyond spaceships, androids and aliens, and encompasses African mythology and cosmology with an aim to connect those from across the Black Diaspora to their forgotten African ancestry.” More on Afrofuturism and its promise, here. (via @Ponderiss)

Cab Calloway’s Jive Dictionary

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Learn to speak jive like all the hep cats do.

“Rankin / Bass’s The Thing”

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Trailer for Rankin / Bass’s The Thing. (Also, please enjoy The Thing re-enacted with G.I. Joe action figures).

Interview with Doc Hammer

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Doc Hammer talks about The Venture Bros., janked-up tattoos and art with Inked Magazine.

The Goblin and The Resurrected Witch, Live in Budapest

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Jean-Michel Van Schouwburg (“The Goblin”) and Katalin Ladik (“The Resurrected Witch”) from the intensely sonic, Berberian Sound Studio, offer a performance of their vocal talent with sound designer Pál Tóth (aka, én) in Budapest.

James Joyce vs. Kool Keith

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Who said it, James Joyce or Kool Keith?

Pop Culture That Makes Pop Culture Happy Hour Cry

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On Pop Culture Happy Hour, Linda, Stephen and Chris share what pop culture makes them cry and why.

The Voice of Night Vale

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The Daily Dot interviews Cecil Baldwin, the voice of the eerie podcast, Welcome To Night Vale.

“Electric Lady (Kiss) Land: Blade Runner and R&B”

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At Popshifter, Paul Casey looks at Blade Runner, Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep,  Janelle Monáe’s The Electric Lady and The Weeknd’s Kiss Land. “Where The Electric Lady is uplifting and empowering, the story of a righteous dissident fighting for every wronged being in existence, Kiss Land is from the other side. […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Actor Richard Kiel has died. Kiel worked in both film and television, including performances in The Twilight Zone episode, “To Serve Man”; Eegah (1962); The Barbary Coast with William Shatner; Happy Gilmore (1996); Pale Rider (1985); as Vlad in Tangled (201); and as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).   The New York TimesThe Los Angeles Times and Variety have obituaries. Here he is interviewed with Britt Ekland. And David Letterman interviews Kiel here.

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    Open Culture has a round-up of eight free and complete films by Dziga Vertov, including Man With A Movie Camera (1929) and the first Soviet animated feature, Soviet Toys (1924). (Thanks, Earl!)

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    Matt Zoller Seitz has written a lovely meditation on Robin Williams at RogerEbert.com: “Williams wore the invisible garments of depression. He carried that burden. A lot of the time we didn’t see it, because he was a bright and enthusiastic comic performer and a great actor. But the weight was always there.

    Somehow he lived 63 years.

    What a warrior he was.”

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    At Kaiju Shakedown, Hiroshi Fukazawa interviews director Ringo Lam. “Not as flashy as John Woo, never as hyperkinetic as Tsui Hark, Ringo Lam is one of Hong Kong’s most underappreciated directors. He made his name with sophisticated, downbeat crime dramas that came to define a certain style of urban Hong Kong cinema in the Eighties and early Nineties. After getting his start in television at CTV and TVB, he directed five features before finding his stride with 1987’s City on Fire, the movie that provided the blueprint for Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs.”

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    “[Grace] Jones — who was famous not just for her music, but also for her acting and modeling — took Lundgren to New York, where they partied at the legendary Studio 54 and Andy Warhol took pictures of Lundgren. Jones introduced Lundgren to the world of show business. Meanwhile, Lundgren was still set to begin his Fulbright scholarship at MIT. ‘I started sort of thinking, “Wow, this is kind of cool,”‘ Lundgren remembers: ‘”I don’t know if I want to go back to engineering after this.”‘ More at NPR.

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    “A mid-20th century collaboration between artists, poets and printers gave rise to a unique book of surrealistic creatures accompanied by complementary typographic art poems.” See more at BibliOdyssey. (Thanks, Andrezo!)

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