The Cultural Gutter

geek chic with mad technique

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“As Much As I Can, As Black As I Am: The Queer History of Grace Jones”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Pitchfork, Barry Walters writes about Grace Jones. “One night in 1993, I finally got my chance to see Jones perform at a local gay nightclub and took my friend Brian, whose partner Mark was too sick to join us….She didn’t back away from the elephant in the room: She dedicated one song to artist […]

“Billie Holiday on Swing Street”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At The Alcohol Professor, The Gutter’s own Keith writes about Billie Holiday in a fantastic two-part piece. Part one traces “the history of Billie Holiday and NYC nightlife through the Harlem Renaissance to Café Society.” Part two covers “Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra and the jazz scene in New York City clubs of a bygone era.”

Bitch Planet Studies Exploitation With Exploitation”

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Sequential Art, Ian Dawe writes about Kelly Sue Deconnick and Valentine de Landro’s comic, Bitch Planet. “The first thing to understand about this comic is that it’s a deep homage to 1970s science fiction, sports movies and exploitation pornography. Artist Valentine De Landro uses the visual language of films like 1974’s Caged Heat, but […]

Diverse Mysteries List

naked gutterthon 2015 thumbnail

At Girls Wear Capes, Constance Gibbs shares a list of diverse mysteries for Girls Wear Capes‘ Diverse Reads Week. “I grew up reading mystery novels and obsessed over Veronica Mars. I probably read more Agatha Christie than a ten year old should, plus Encyclopedia Brown, some Nancy Drew computer games, and the Sammy Keyes novel […]

“Urban Fantasy Writers of Color: An Ongoing List”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Daniel José Older has an ongoing list of people of color who write urban fantasy. You can see it here–and seem some discussion of “narrow genre subdivisions” and writers of color between Older and Nalo Hopkinson. “And as complex as it is, I think there’s power in seeing who’s out there making literary magic out […]

“Black Women Horror Writers: Interview with Jayde Brooks”

Graveyard Shift Sisters Eden Royce interviews writer Jayde Brooks and reviews Brooks’ Daughter of Gods and Shadows. “If you’re looking for a sweeping, dark adventure/quest novel, look no further. This story had what I love to read in a book: strong female characters and the ultimate in high stakes – saving the world. Blend that […]

Thoughts on J.G. Jones & Mark Waid’s Strange Fruit

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Women Write About comics, J. A. Micheline writes about “The White Privilege, White Audacity and White Priorities of Strange Fruit #1.” JG Jones & Mark Waid’s new comic about an alien landing in the American South in 1927, an alien who appears as a Black man. Meanwhile, Joseph Phillip Illidge had written about the […]

“Every Word Spoken By A Person Of Color In Famous Films”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Dylan Marron has made a series of videos based on every word spoken by a person of color in various films, including Moonrise Kingdom, Her and Into The Woods. “Marron, a biracial native of Venezuela who grew up in New York, started the video series to figure out why so few people of colour are […]

Andrew Nette Thinks About Pulp

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Andrew Nette has a pair of interesting pieces on pulp you might be interested in. First, he writes about “the New Pulp” and a bit about Fifty Shades of Gray in “Fifty Shades of Pulp.” Then he writes about pulp and literacy and furthering social advancement in “Pulp and Circumstance.”  “Most people view pulp as […]

Interview with Lexi Alexander

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Kernal interviews director Lexi Alexander about the film industry, the ACLU investigation of gender discrimination in Hollywood, the connection between file-sharing and gender equality, trying to get an Arab-led series on television and the problem with crowdfunding.

“A History of Race in Science Fiction Films”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Graveyard Shift Sisters reviews Adilifu Nama’s Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film and looks at the history of race in science fiction films from teh 1950s to the present. “Adilifu Nama concocted a thorough read that blends a critical look at science fiction cinema’s milestone works in conjunction with American sociopolitical history, specifically […]

“Unbranded”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

NPR interviews Hank Willis Thomas on his exhibition showcasing images of white women in advertizing. It’s a follow up to his 2008 exhibition, “Unbranded: Reflections in Black by Corporate America.” “I think what happens with ads — when we put text and logos on them, we do all the heavy lifting of making them make […]

“Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Hyperallergic, Jeremy Polacek writes about the history of Afrofuturism and the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s exhibit, “Space Is The Place: AfroFuturism On Film”:  “Afrofuturism is an empowering rubric, an approach and aesthetic that clarifies and connects history and the hope, creativity, and pain there within. Afrofuturism is wry, wise, and leveling — it believes that a brighter, more […]

Absolute Beginners ’86

abthumbnail

When Julien Temple’s Absolute Beginners was released in 1986 it was met with general indifference and some critical dismissals. While the film may have some problems, today its reputation seems to be clouded by the misconception that it single-handedly ruined the prestigious British film studio Goldcrest and was universally panned. Neither of these assumptions is […]

“Humanity Not Included: DC’s Cyborg and the Mechanization of the Black Body”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At The Middle Spaces, Robert Jones, Jr. writes about Cyborg: “DC Comics’ Cyborg is my least favorite black character currently being published in comic books. He illustrates how the black body functions in a white supremacist framework and embodies so many different offensive stereotypes of black people that it is necessary to enumerate these characteristics […]

“We Are Not Colonists”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Boing Boing, Gita Jackson writes about gaming, art, minority voices, colonialism and Benedict Anderson’s “imagined communities”: “When marginalized voices come to take their seat at the table, there will always be an outcry that they are invaders, colonists, inferior versions of their straight, white male counterparts. But rather than killing artforms, the addition of […]

“Lighten Up”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At The Nib, Ronald Wimberley tells a story and elucidates the implications of being asked to lighten a character’s skin tone for a Wolverine And the X-Men jam comic.

“Considering Beloved

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Ashlee Blackwell considers Jonathan Demme’s Beloved as a horror film as part of their Black History & Women In Horror Month series. “Beloved takes us on one journey of the Black American experience of slavery through the body of a Black female protagonist.”

Mucking Up The Respectable Comics Business

Sorrow01-Cov-B-Frison

I’ve been thinking about disreputable art more than usual lately, between the film adaptation of 50 Shades of Grey coming out and Jonathan Franzen franzenating about women mucking up the whole respectable novel business. I can’t help but think of the history of the novel in Europe and North America. A tawdry form that was […]

“Let’s Talk About The Women Of The Walking Dead

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Bitch Media, Sara Century wonders why Michonne isn’t in charge and considers which medium is better for the ladies of The Walking Dead: comics or tv. “As I was thinking about the numerous questionable writing choices made with these could-be-so-great female characters, I got to wondering, which medium is better for the ladies of […]

keep looking »
  • Support Gutterthon 2015!

  • The Book!

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Rob and Mike watch Edgar Ulmer’s The Black Cat (1934) at The Projection Booth. “The first big American studio film — and last big American studio film – directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, The Black Cat is, uh, ‘inspired’ by Edgar Allan Poe’s short story and stars Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff in a taut game of life and death.”

    ~

    Gentleman’s Gazette has a piece on the sartorial splendor of Hercule Poirot and of Captain Hastings in the BBC television adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Poirot mysteries.

    ~

    At Pitchfork, Barry Walters writes about Grace Jones. “One night in 1993, I finally got my chance to see Jones perform at a local gay nightclub and took my friend Brian, whose partner Mark was too sick to join us….She didn’t back away from the elephant in the room: She dedicated one song to artist and AIDS casualty Keith Haring, who had used her body for a canvas on the occasion of her legendary 1985 Paradise Garage performance. That night’s show was remarkable for the simple fact that Jones just kept on going, granting one encore request after another, waiting patiently while the sound man scoured backing tapes to find the fans’ offbeat choices. When Jones got to such minor numbers as ‘Crush,’ it became clear that she didn’t want to leave. She was giving as much of herself as she could to the beleaguered troops, knowing full well that many wouldn’t live long enough to see her again.”

    ~

    At Pornokitsch, The Gutter’s own dame with a shady past Carol writes about five films noir.  “Do you want to watch some film noir? I hope so, because I have five films to suggest. Films about dames gone wrong, poor doomed saps, murders, sex and modern knights errant.”

    ~

    At The Alcohol Professor, The Gutter’s own Keith writes about Billie Holiday in a fantastic two-part piece. Part one traces “the history of Billie Holiday and NYC nightlife through the Harlem Renaissance to Café Society.” Part two covers “Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra and the jazz scene in New York City clubs of a bygone era.”

    ~

    The New Yorker has a profile of author Gene Wolfe. “His narrators may be prophets, or liars, or merely crazy, but somewhere in their stories they help to reveal what Wolfe most wants his readers to know: that compassion can withstand the most brutal of futures and exist on the most distant planets, and it has been part of us since ages long past.”

    ~

  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.

    -------

  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: