The Cultural Gutter

geek chic with mad technique

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“Dream-Casting The Live-Action Gargoyles Movie That Does Not Exist”

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At The Toast, Mallory Ortberg creates her dream cast for a rebooted Gargoyles series. “Look, I’m not here to explain the appeal of a decades-old children’s series about living architectural flourishes to you. Either you saw it, and you understand the unique blend of Shakespeare, European folklore, the pain of centuries of isolation and the […]

“Bad News: Universal Is ‘Re-Imagining’ Its Classic Monsters”

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At The Telegraph, Anne Billson shares the bad news about Universal’s “reimagining” its classic monsters, the problem with big budget horror, and filmmakers who don’t get horror. “Another problem is that upmarket film-makers who have built their reputations in more prestigious genres just don’t “get” horror, so when they deign to make a horror movie, […]

KPBS’ Midday Movies: The Geek Roundtable discusses Remakes

At KPBS’ Midday Movies, Beth Accomando, Miguel Rodriguez and Ian Forbes discuss film remakes: “Remake, sequel, prequel, reboot, reimagining – whatever you want to call it, Hollywood does love to return to something familiar. So what makes a good remake? Is it really a bad thing to remake an old film? Is this a new […]

BBC Remake + Kevin Spacey + David Fincher = You Will Watch

The Fractured Atlas has an interesting piece on Netflix’s House of Cards, the Nutcracker, data analysis and driving new content development in the arts. And Andrew Leonard has more at Salon: “Netflix’s data indicated that the same subscribers who loved the original BBC production also gobbled down movies starring Kevin Spacey or directed by David […]

Hollywood and Industrialized Plagiarism

At Geek Juice, Josh Hadley’s “Industrialized Plagiarism” responds to a Village Voice piece, “How To Defend Quentin Tarantino.” Read them together for QT, Hollywood SOP, Harlan Ellison, homages, plagiarism and more.

Nostalgia or Awesomeness?

Was Robocop the best and most subversive action movie of the action movie’s golden period? Is there also some nostalgia at play?

Pingu’s The Thing

The Thing remade as an episode of Pingu.  

Curious about The Thing remake?

Peter Watts has an interest in the remake of The Thing (see here for why), and he has some entertaining things to say: “For one thing, there are just too many similarities between the two films for me to accept that this is truly a prequel and not just a remake. This goes beyond the […]

Cartoon Trailers!

Cartoon Network has trailers for the upcoming animated shows, ThunderCats and Legend of Korra, the sequel to Avatar: The Last Airbender as well as an extended look at Green Lantern: The Animated Series  with a short peek at the LEGO Ninja show, Ninjago.

Singham Trailer

“Don’t fuck with Bajirao Singham.” Cars roll, guns are drawn and Bajirao Singham tears a lamp post up and hits a guy with it in this trailer for Singham, a remake of the Tamil action film, Singam, directed by Hari and starring Surya Sivakumar.

Most Anticipated Asian Films of 2011

Wildgrounds breaks down their most anticipated films of 2011.

80 Years of Genre Snubs

Horror movies are celebrating their hundredth year in 2010, with the anniversary of the 1910 Edison Lab’s production of Frankenstein.  Bloody Disgusting catalogs “some of the biggest…genre snubs in Oscar history, in Part Four of B-D’s ‘100 Years in Horror’ series.”

Let Me In: Deletion Explained

Slash Film has a deleted scene from Let Me In and video of director Matt Reeves explaining the cut.

25 Or 6 To A Better Tomorrow?

This trailer for the Korean remake of John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow has Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4″ going through my head. (thanks, brian!)

Knock, Knock

Who’s there? Why it’s the trailer for Let Me In, the American remake of Let The Right One In.

The Fog (1980) vs The Fog (2005)

October has an extensive and exquisite analysis of The Fog (1980) and The Fog (2005), ranging from the implications of the changes to the original, some tangents relating to John Carpenter’s other films and “alienation vs. connection.”  (via The Horror?!)

Science Determines the Best and Worst Genres

Science analyzes the best and worst types of genre movies. Results listed here.

I Can See Forever

It’s like the 1980s are a black hole and the event horizon reaches forever: The A-Team, The Karate Kid, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Tron, Ghostbusters, Conan The Barbarian, Red Dawn, Short Circuit and Wall Street.

“Stupid, stupid, stupid, stupid!”

You are interested in the future, because that is where you will live and you must decide what you will do to survive Plan 9. (Thanks, Eric, for the Plan 9 from Outer Space title quote).

“The Stunning Case of the Three Gunshots”

Zhang Yimou is remaking the Coen Bros. Blood Simple, or as it will be known from now on, The Stunning Case of the Three Gunshots. (It’s going to star Sun Honglei from Mongol).

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    In honor of director Mario Bava’s birthday, Shudder TV is having a Bava-thon with nine of his classic horror films chosen by friend of the Gutter Colin Geddes streaming free online all weekend. See the line-up here and watch here.

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    There’s a set of Star Wars cards autographed with amusing comments by Mark Hamill at imgur.

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    The Projection Booth watches Night Moves (1975) with special guest host the Gutter’s own Carol. “Arthur Penn’s Night Moves (1975) stars Gene Hackman as Harry Moseby, a private eye trying to find himself in a post-Watergate America. We’re joined by Nat Segaloff, author of Arthur Penn: American Director and Carol Borden of the Cultural Gutter.”

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    At Graveyard Shift Sisters, Ashlee Blackwell considers love in Ganja & Hess. ” It is up to the viewer to map a path that suits their understanding. What writer/director Bill Gunn (who plays Dr. Hess’ assistant) wanted was a disruption of mainstream fare. Gunn didn’t seem too interested in what Hollywood desired, and like many writers, wrote a screenplay that felt personal and needed to be written. It tackles so many themes, it’s almost difficult to begin. While most rely on it being vampiric and about addiction, it’s important to note the journey that Hess and Ganja embark on together. Their romantic entanglement may by one of the most fascinating aspects of the film that is commonly overlooked because it is challenging to simplify.”

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    Friend of the Gutter Less Lee Moore interviews friend of the Gutter Colin Geddes about his work on the new horror streaming service, Shudder.

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    The Bowery Boys Podcast dedicates an episode to New York City in the history of comic books. “In the 1890s a newspaper rivalry between William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer helped bring about the birth of the comic strip and, a few decades later, the comic book.  Today, comic book superheroes are bigger than ever — in blockbuster summer movies and television shows — and most of them still have an inseparable bond with New York City.”

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