The Cultural Gutter

unashamed geekery

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

KPBS’ Midday Movies: The Geek Roundtable discusses Remakes

At KPBS’ Midday Movies, Beth Accomando, Miguel Rodriguez and Ian Forbes discuss film remakes: “Remake, sequel, prequel, reboot, reimagining – whatever you want to call it, Hollywood does love to return to something familiar. So what makes a good remake? Is it really a bad thing to remake an old film? Is this a new […]

BBC Remake + Kevin Spacey + David Fincher = You Will Watch

The Fractured Atlas has an interesting piece on Netflix’s House of Cards, the Nutcracker, data analysis and driving new content development in the arts. And Andrew Leonard has more at Salon: “Netflix’s data indicated that the same subscribers who loved the original BBC production also gobbled down movies starring Kevin Spacey or directed by David […]

Hollywood and Industrialized Plagiarism

At Geek Juice, Josh Hadley’s “Industrialized Plagiarism” responds to a Village Voice piece, “How To Defend Quentin Tarantino.” Read them together for QT, Hollywood SOP, Harlan Ellison, homages, plagiarism and more.

Nostalgia or Awesomeness?

Was Robocop the best and most subversive action movie of the action movie’s golden period? Is there also some nostalgia at play?

Pingu’s The Thing

The Thing remade as an episode of Pingu.  

Curious about The Thing remake?

Peter Watts has an interest in the remake of The Thing (see here for why), and he has some entertaining things to say: “For one thing, there are just too many similarities between the two films for me to accept that this is truly a prequel and not just a remake. This goes beyond the […]

Cartoon Trailers!

Cartoon Network has trailers for the upcoming animated shows, ThunderCats and Legend of Korra, the sequel to Avatar: The Last Airbender as well as an extended look at Green Lantern: The Animated Series  with a short peek at the LEGO Ninja show, Ninjago.

Singham Trailer

“Don’t fuck with Bajirao Singham.” Cars roll, guns are drawn and Bajirao Singham tears a lamp post up and hits a guy with it in this trailer for Singham, a remake of the Tamil action film, Singam, directed by Hari and starring Surya Sivakumar.

Most Anticipated Asian Films of 2011

Wildgrounds breaks down their most anticipated films of 2011.

80 Years of Genre Snubs

Horror movies are celebrating their hundredth year in 2010, with the anniversary of the 1910 Edison Lab’s production of Frankenstein.  Bloody Disgusting catalogs “some of the biggest…genre snubs in Oscar history, in Part Four of B-D’s ‘100 Years in Horror’ series.”

Let Me In: Deletion Explained

Slash Film has a deleted scene from Let Me In and video of director Matt Reeves explaining the cut.

25 Or 6 To A Better Tomorrow?

This trailer for the Korean remake of John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow has Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4″ going through my head. (thanks, brian!)

Knock, Knock

Who’s there? Why it’s the trailer for Let Me In, the American remake of Let The Right One In.

The Fog (1980) vs The Fog (2005)

October has an extensive and exquisite analysis of The Fog (1980) and The Fog (2005), ranging from the implications of the changes to the original, some tangents relating to John Carpenter’s other films and “alienation vs. connection.”  (via The Horror?!)

Science Determines the Best and Worst Genres

Science analyzes the best and worst types of genre movies. Results listed here.

I Can See Forever

It’s like the 1980s are a black hole and the event horizon reaches forever: The A-Team, The Karate Kid, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Tron, Ghostbusters, Conan The Barbarian, Red Dawn, Short Circuit and Wall Street.

“Stupid, stupid, stupid, stupid!”

You are interested in the future, because that is where you will live and you must decide what you will do to survive Plan 9. (Thanks, Eric, for the Plan 9 from Outer Space title quote).

“The Stunning Case of the Three Gunshots”

Zhang Yimou is remaking the Coen Bros. Blood Simple, or as it will be known from now on, The Stunning Case of the Three Gunshots. (It’s going to star Sun Honglei from Mongol).

Re-Taking Pelham 1 2 3

Linda Holmes and Andrew O’Hehir see some things in John Travolta’s The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 villain: “the lamentably noisy bad guy” replacing a more chilling, bureaucratic evil and a far more awesome possible movie:  “Freddie Mercury …. starring in some cracked Tony Scott movie where he gets awesome wireless reception in a […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    Actor Richard Kiel has died. Kiel worked in both film and television, including performances in The Twilight Zone episode, “To Serve Man”; Eegah (1962); The Barbary Coast with William Shatner; Happy Gilmore (1996); Pale Rider (1985); as Vlad in Tangled (201); and as Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).   The New York TimesThe Los Angeles Times and Variety have obituaries. Here he is interviewed with Britt Ekland. And David Letterman interviews Kiel here.

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    Open Culture has a round-up of eight free and complete films by Dziga Vertov, including Man With A Movie Camera (1929) and the first Soviet animated feature, Soviet Toys (1924). (Thanks, Earl!)

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    Matt Zoller Seitz has written a lovely meditation on Robin Williams at RogerEbert.com: “Williams wore the invisible garments of depression. He carried that burden. A lot of the time we didn’t see it, because he was a bright and enthusiastic comic performer and a great actor. But the weight was always there.

    Somehow he lived 63 years.

    What a warrior he was.”

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    At Kaiju Shakedown, Hiroshi Fukazawa interviews director Ringo Lam. “Not as flashy as John Woo, never as hyperkinetic as Tsui Hark, Ringo Lam is one of Hong Kong’s most underappreciated directors. He made his name with sophisticated, downbeat crime dramas that came to define a certain style of urban Hong Kong cinema in the Eighties and early Nineties. After getting his start in television at CTV and TVB, he directed five features before finding his stride with 1987’s City on Fire, the movie that provided the blueprint for Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs.”

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    “[Grace] Jones — who was famous not just for her music, but also for her acting and modeling — took Lundgren to New York, where they partied at the legendary Studio 54 and Andy Warhol took pictures of Lundgren. Jones introduced Lundgren to the world of show business. Meanwhile, Lundgren was still set to begin his Fulbright scholarship at MIT. ‘I started sort of thinking, “Wow, this is kind of cool,”‘ Lundgren remembers: ‘”I don’t know if I want to go back to engineering after this.”‘ More at NPR.

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    “A mid-20th century collaboration between artists, poets and printers gave rise to a unique book of surrealistic creatures accompanied by complementary typographic art poems.” See more at BibliOdyssey. (Thanks, Andrezo!)

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