The Cultural Gutter

geek chic with mad technique

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

A Collection of Calaveras

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The Library of Congress has scans of José Guadalupe Posada broadsheet illustrations, including many calaveras for your enjoyment! Like this:Like Loading…

Art History, Digitized

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The Princeton University Digital Library has digitized three Seventeenth Century Japanese illustrated scrolls and you can view them here. Meanwhile, 100,000 images from Getty Research Institute are now available at the Digital Library of America. (via @BibliOdyssey) Like this:Like Loading…

RIP, Stan Goldberg

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Comic Artist Stan Goldberg has died. Best known for his work on Archie Comics, Goldberg also worked for Marvel and DC. He drew romance comics including Patsy Walker and Millie the Model. He worked on Archie Meets The Punisher. And recently he drew Nancy Drew and the Clue Drew.  Comic Book Resources, The Comics Beat […]

Wallace Wood’s The Horror Of Party Beach

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Last night, the Drive-In Mob watched The Horror Of Party Beach (1964) together and Mobster @Kinetograph shared this Wallace Wood and Russ Jones fumetti / photo comic adaptation of the same. Like this:Like Loading…

“The World of Kamandi”

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Comic Book Cartography has Jack Kirby’s map of “The World of Kamandi.” (Thanks, Lt. Wilkes!) Like this:Like Loading…

“Star Wars: The Marvel Comics Years”

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The Superhero Satellite has an overview of Marvel’s Star Wars comics–with a pretty sweet gallery. (via @BlackHoleMovies) Like this:Like Loading…

“Martin Luther King & The Montgomery Story” Comic

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A complete digital edition of  Martin Luther King & The Montgomery Story (1956), the comic that inspired Rep. John Lewis to pursue nonviolence and social justice. Like this:Like Loading…

One Million Images

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“The British Library has uploaded one million public domain scans from 17th-19th century books to Flickr!” (Thanks, Kate!) Like this:Like Loading…

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Manuscripts

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The Shelley-Godwin Archive has posted all available manuscripts of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Open Culture has a little more context–and a nice engraved frontispiece, “Frankenstein’s Creature,” made by W. Chevalier and T. Holst for the 1831 edition. Like this:Like Loading…

“Steve Ditko Out Of This World Megapost”

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Celebrate comics artist and creator Steve Ditko’s birthday with this gallery of his work for <i>Out Of This World</i>. Like this:Like Loading…

A History of Codex Seraphinianus

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Abe Books has a look inside Codex Seraphinianus, as well as some of its publication history. Dangerous Minds interviews publisher, Charles Miers. Like this:Like Loading…

Metropolis Magazine

Program pages for Fritz Lang’s Metropolis depicting “Scenes, Story and Incidents in the Making of the World’s Greatest Modern Spectacular Film Masterpiece[.]” Like this:Like Loading…

Vintage Ninja

Vintage Ninja offers, “A 1962 Point of View” on “ninjutsu”–including covers and pages from an out of print copy of Jay Gluck’s Zen Combat. My favorite line, “The ninja never swaggered.” Like this:Like Loading…

Muckey Spleen’s The Bloody Drip

Walt Kelly presents Pogo‘s Albert Alligator in Muckey Spleen’s The Bloody Drip,  “a Publication of the New National Treasury of World Culture.” Like this:Like Loading…

Framing Stan Lee

Some pretty sweet portraiture by Joel Kimmel for “The Inquisition of Ms. Marvel.” Like this:Like Loading…

Scans of Man Gataro’s Art

Pages from comic artist/mangaka Man Gataro’s Jigoku Koshien / Battlefield Baseball, vol. 2 at The Joseph Luster Report. Like this:Like Loading…

Captain 3-D Page by Jack Kirby, Mort Meskin and Joe Simon

Seven scans of one Captain 3-D page, pencils by Jack Kirby, inks by Mort Meskin.   Like this:Like Loading…

RIP, Joe Kubert

Comics creator, educator and founder of The Kubert School, Joe Kubert has died.  The Beat has an obituary.  NPR’s Monkey See has an appreciation with links to many others, including a gallery of Kubert’s comics covers. The New York Times has a slide show including pictures of his workspace and his original art.  Here he […]

“Great Changes After The Liberation”

ChinaSmack has scans of of a 1950 propaganda comic predicting China’s future. “From the portrayal of working class hardship, to unaffordable housing, to foreigners behaving as they please in China, the problems of pre-liberation China seems to remain very much relevant even to this day.” (via @paleofuture) Like this:Like Loading…

“As Told To Stan Lee”

Dedicated to romance comics–especially Marvel romance comics–As Told To Stan Lee shares panels of shirtless men and bikini-clad ladies in love. (Thanks, Keith!) Like this:Like Loading…

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Comics Alliance, Chris Sims talk abouts the art of lettering in comics. “Comic book lettering is up there with inking and coloring in the holy trinity of underrated comic book skills, but it’s also one of those things that, once you start paying attention to it, you’ll never be able to not notice it again. I’m not exaggerating even a little bit when I say that it’s one of those things that can absolutely ruin a comic if it’s done wrong, even if everything else is perfect. But to be honest, of those three elements, lettering is still probably the most underrated. The thing is, when it’s good, it can be absolutely gorgeous in its own right. And fortunately for us, there are a lot of people who do it very, very well.”

    ~

    Comics Alliance suggests seven Star Wars comics to read before Disney makes them disappear. (Including a comic by one of Comics Editor Carol’s favorite creative teams–Corinna Bechko and Gabriel Hardman). “Starting in 2015, Disney’s handing the publishing of any and all new Star Wars comics over to Marvel Comics, with an all new, optimized-for-corporate-synergy canon that will spread across all their media platforms. Anything that’s not a movie (especially one of the Original Trilogy movies), or a Clone Wars cartoon, will be unceremoniously Order 66-ed out of existence, giving future filmmakers a clean-ish slate to make movies (and money) on. But what about all those Dark Horse comics? That’s where we come in with 7 Dark Horse Star Wars comics you should track down before they disappear.”

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    At the New York Observer, Ashley Steves writes about Craig Ferguson’s The Late, Late Show. “No one could ever prepare you for watching an episode of Ferguson’s Late Late Show. A friend could not sit you down and explain it (“Well, it’s really meta and deconstructive and there’s a horse”). There was really no good way to recommend it. It was something you discovered and became a part of. You had to stumble upon it on your own, perhaps restless or bored or simply curious while flipping through channels when your eye quickly caught some of the madness. And that’s the best part. It was an unexpected gift. At its worst, it could still send you to bed grinning and comforted. At its best, it was art. It was silly and fun and truly not like any other late night show.”

    ~

    At Comics Alliance, Chris Sims interviews Ed Brubaker about his work on Batman, Gotham Central and Catwoman. “When I look back at [Catwoman], I’m so proud of the first 25 issues of that book, when I felt like everything was firing on all cylinders. I probably should’ve left when Cameron Stewart left instead of sticking around. That’s one of those things I look back at and think “Ah, I had a perfect run up until then!” (Incidentally, Comics Editor Carol’s first piece for the Gutter was about Brubaker’s first 25 issues of Catwoman).

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    At Sequential Art, Greg Carpenter writes a lovely piece about Charles Schulz’ Peanuts. “After only two installments, Schulz had solidified the rules for his comic strip.  Random acts of cruelty would punctuate this irrational world, and Schulz’s trapped little adults would be forced to act out simulations of human behavior, using hollow gestures to try to create meaning in a universe where no other meaning was evident.  If Shakespeare’s Macbeth had been a cartoonist, the results of his daily grind, “tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow,” might have looked somewhat similar—each character a “poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage” until he or she was heard from no more.”

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    The Smithsonian Magazine has a gallery of US spy satellite launches. “Just as NASA creates specially designed patches for each mission into space, [National Reconnaissance Office] follows that tradition for its spy satellite launches. But while NASA patches tend to feature space ships and American flags, NRO prefers wizards, Vikings, teddy bears and the all-seeing eye. With these outlandish designs, a civilian would be justified in wondering if NRO is trolling.”

    ~

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