The Cultural Gutter

dangerous because it has a philosophy

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Wallace Wood’s The Horror Of Party Beach

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Last night, the Drive-In Mob watched The Horror Of Party Beach (1964) together and Mobster @Kinetograph shared this Wallace Wood and Russ Jones fumetti / photo comic adaptation of the same.

“The World of Kamandi”

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Comic Book Cartography has Jack Kirby’s map of “The World of Kamandi.” (Thanks, Lt. Wilkes!)

“Star Wars: The Marvel Comics Years”

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The Superhero Satellite has an overview of Marvel’s Star Wars comics–with a pretty sweet gallery. (via @BlackHoleMovies)

“Martin Luther King & The Montgomery Story” Comic

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A complete digital edition of  Martin Luther King & The Montgomery Story (1956), the comic that inspired Rep. John Lewis to pursue nonviolence and social justice.

One Million Images

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“The British Library has uploaded one million public domain scans from 17th-19th century books to Flickr!” (Thanks, Kate!)

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Manuscripts

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The Shelley-Godwin Archive has posted all available manuscripts of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Open Culture has a little more context–and a nice engraved frontispiece, “Frankenstein’s Creature,” made by W. Chevalier and T. Holst for the 1831 edition.

“Steve Ditko Out Of This World Megapost”

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Celebrate comics artist and creator Steve Ditko’s birthday with this gallery of his work for <i>Out Of This World</i>.

A History of Codex Seraphinianus

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Abe Books has a look inside Codex Seraphinianus, as well as some of its publication history. Dangerous Minds interviews publisher, Charles Miers.

Metropolis Magazine

Program pages for Fritz Lang’s Metropolis depicting “Scenes, Story and Incidents in the Making of the World’s Greatest Modern Spectacular Film Masterpiece[.]“

Vintage Ninja

Vintage Ninja offers, “A 1962 Point of View” on “ninjutsu”–including covers and pages from an out of print copy of Jay Gluck’s Zen Combat. My favorite line, “The ninja never swaggered.”

Muckey Spleen’s The Bloody Drip

Walt Kelly presents Pogo‘s Albert Alligator in Muckey Spleen’s The Bloody Drip,  “a Publication of the New National Treasury of World Culture.”

Framing Stan Lee

Some pretty sweet portraiture by Joel Kimmel for “The Inquisition of Ms. Marvel.”

Scans of Man Gataro’s Art

Pages from comic artist/mangaka Man Gataro’s Jigoku Koshien / Battlefield Baseball, vol. 2 at The Joseph Luster Report.

Captain 3-D Page by Jack Kirby, Mort Meskin and Joe Simon

Seven scans of one Captain 3-D page, pencils by Jack Kirby, inks by Mort Meskin.  

RIP, Joe Kubert

Comics creator, educator and founder of The Kubert School, Joe Kubert has died.  The Beat has an obituary.  NPR’s Monkey See has an appreciation with links to many others, including a gallery of Kubert’s comics covers. The New York Times has a slide show including pictures of his workspace and his original art.  Here he […]

“Great Changes After The Liberation”

ChinaSmack has scans of of a 1950 propaganda comic predicting China’s future. “From the portrayal of working class hardship, to unaffordable housing, to foreigners behaving as they please in China, the problems of pre-liberation China seems to remain very much relevant even to this day.” (via @paleofuture)

“As Told To Stan Lee”

Dedicated to romance comics–especially Marvel romance comics–As Told To Stan Lee shares panels of shirtless men and bikini-clad ladies in love. (Thanks, Keith!)

The Power of Paper!

Artist Yusuke Murata displays the awesome power of paper in an amazing comic about an artist avoiding his work.  (Thanks, Andrew!)

Wonder Woman vs. Xena

Beau Smith tells the story of the Wonder Woman vs. Xena comic that never came to be–with snippets of his script and pages of Eduardo Barreto’s art. (via DCWomenKickingAss)

The Story of Negro Romance

History Detectives has 13 pages of, “Possessed, ” a story from a comic, Negro Romance. Watch the segment  to learn more about the history African-Americans in comics, how the comic represents changes in American society after World War II and the creators of Negro Romance.  (There is also a link to the full 55 minute […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Badass Digest, Gaming Editor Andrew Todd writes about “rampant issues with sexism, homophobia, and racism within the gaming industry.”

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    Jenn Frank writes about horror, games, “Tropes vs Women In Video Games” and “consuming media responsibly”: “I think what I’m getting at is, especially with the horror genre, it’s less important what a movie says and more important that you, the viewer, understand why you’re enjoying it. I believe in judicious self-awareness; a director like Nicolas Winding Refn knows exactly why he makes the directorial choices he makes, and he works those kinks right out onscreen.

    Or, if you aren’t enjoying a piece of work—if ultraviolence isn’t your thing, or if you’re suffering a visceral reaction—it’s every bit as important that you identify what about the piece is making you uncomfortable.”

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    In  Tropes vs. Women in Video Games, “Women As Background Decoration: Part 2,” Anita Sarkeesian discusses “how sexualized female bodies often occupy a dual role as both sexual playthings and the perpetual victims of male violence.” It is quite graphic in terms of violence and sexual violence.

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    Here are the films playing the Vanguard program at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival: Spring; Luna; Hyena; Goodnight, Mommy / Ich Seh, Ich Seh; Alleluia; The Duke Of Burgundy; Over Your Dead Body; Shrew’s Nest; They Have Escaped; Waste Land; The World of Kanako; and The Voices. (Trailers added as they become available).

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    Here are the films playing the Toronto International Film Festival’s Midnight Madness program: Tokyo Tribe; Big Game; Tusk; It Follows; Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films; [REC]4: Apocalypse; Cub; The Editor; and, What We Do In The Shadows and The Guest. (More trailers as they become available).

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    The Guardian has collected some responses Haruki Murakami gave to reader questions at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. “I don’t have any idea at all, when I start writing, of what is to come. For instance, for The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, the first thing I had was the call of the bird, because I heard a bird in my back yard (it was the first time I heard that kind of sound and I never have since then. I felt like it was predicting something. So I wanted to write about it). The next thing was cooking spaghetti – these are things that happen to me! I was cooking spaghetti, and somebody call. So I had just these two things at the start. Two years I kept on writing. It’s fun! I don’t know what’s going to happen next, every day. I get up, go to the desk, switch on the computer, etc. and say to myself: ‘so what’s going to happen today?’ It’s fun!”

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