The Cultural Gutter

the cult in your pop culture

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“Jennifer Aniston And the Curse of Friends”

At Multiglom, Anne Billson considers Jennifer Aniston and her career. “But there are three things we should realise about Jennifer Aniston: 1) You don’t spend a decade in a well written sitcom without acquiring razor-sharp comic timing and an ability to give shading to characters who might in lesser hands be caricatures. 2) At least […]

RIP, Taylor Negron

Actor and comedian Taylor Negron has died. Negron appeared many films and television series including, Fast Times At Ridgemont High (1982), Easy Money (1983), Better Off Dead (1985), The Last Boy Scout (1991), River’s Edge (1986), The Hughleys, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Reno 911! and That’s So Raven. The Dissolve, AV Club and the Los Angeles […]

“Where True Detective Meets Community

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At SeqArt, Harry Edmundson-Cornell writes about the fourth wall, metafiction, tone and character in True Detective and Community (as well as Bojack Horseman and Rick & Morty). “When a show points out the mechanics driving the medium they’re essentially violating the realism of the art. They’re pointing out the frame of the painting, which tends […]

Parks and Trek

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Neill Cameron has re-imagined the characters of Parks & Recreation as members of Starfleet. (Via @neillcameron)

The Walshes, Online!

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You have 17 days to watch Graham Linehan and Diet of Worms’ The Walshes online. (Read more about The Walshes here and here).

RIP, Elizabeth Peña

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Actor Elizabeth Peña has died. Peña appeared in both film and television including, La Bamba (1987), Batteries Not Included (1987), Blue Steel (1989), L.A. Law, Lone Star (1996),  The Incredibles (2004), Justice League, Prime Suspect and Modern Family. NPR remembers Peña. The Guardian has collected clips of Peña’s work. Latino Review, The New York Times, […]

High diving boards, banana costumes,
and other risks worth taking

Normal Rockwell Boy on High Dive

I come from a family of eggheads, so summer camp for me was usually something like Mini University. We’d play with metal shavings and magnets, or compete to design the most aerodynamic paper planes, but one of the things we also got to do was use the Olympic swimming pool with a full size, triple-decker […]

RIP, Kate O’Mara

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Actor Kate O’Mara has died. She performed the Rani in Doctor Who, Caress Morell in Dynasty, Mademoiselle Perrodot in The Vampire Lovers and Alys in The Horror of Frankenstein. O’Mara also had roles in Absolutely Fabulous, The Avengers, The Saint, Danger Man / Secret Agent, The Persuaders and Adam Adamant Lives!  The Guardian, Digital Spy […]

RIP, David Brenner

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Comedian and actor David Brenner has died. The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. The Comics’ Comic and The Hollywood Reporter remembers Brenner. Here’s Brenner’s first appearance on The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson.

Star Wars Filibuster, Animated

Patton Oswalt’s multi-franchise super-movie described in his Star Wars filibuster from Parks and Recreation, animated.

Fictional Floor Plans

Interior Designer Iñaki Aliste Lizarralde’s floor plans for houses and apartments from The Simpsons, Frasier, Sex and the City, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Up, Seinfeld, and Friends. (Thanks, James!)

RIP, Bonnie Franklin

Actress Bonnie Franklin has died. Franklin was best known for her role as Ann Romano in the sitcom One Day At A Time, but performed on stage as well as on television. Here she is performing in the Tony Awards in the 1970s. The New York Times has an obituary.

50 Wonderful Things in 2012

Linda Holmes shares 50 wonderful things at NPR’s Monkey See blog.

RIP, Larry Hagman

Actor and director (Son of Blob) Larry Hagman has died. The Guardian has an obituary. Joe O’Shea wrote a profile on Hagman’s birthday last September, which included Hagman talking about what he wanted done with his remains: “I would like to be minced. Did you ever see Fargo, when they put the guy in the […]

Recapping The Jetsons: “Elroy’s TV Show”

At Paleofuture, Novak watches The Jetsons and the debates about television depicted in the episode, “Elroy’s Tv Show”: “The episode highlights the perennial debate over the role of TV programming in the American home. The latter half of the 20th century saw numerous fights over the regulation of TV programming and the battles were especially vicious […]

RIP, Sherman Hemsley

Sherman Hemsley has died. Hemsley was most famous as George Jefferson on the tv show, The Jeffersons and Deacon Ernest Frye in Amen. “Years after [The Jeffersons] ended, Hemsley frequently encountered fans who asked him to reenact George’s famous strut from the show’s opening credits. Hemsley said it was inspired by the Philly Slop, a […]

Breaking Bad + Laugh Track

Breaking Bad re-imagined as an ABC sitcom.

In Defense of Liz Lemon

At The New Yorker, Emily Nussbaum feels compelled to defend30 Rock character Liz Lemon in the face of recent “Liz Hate.”  “[O]ne of the most radical things about 30 Rock [has always been] the way it has continually punctured Liz’s image of herself as a spunky brunette underdog.”  A reader suggests everyone read Tiger Beatdown’s, […]

Nick Offerman Interview

It’s the LA Weekly Blog Food Interview with Parks and Recreation‘s Ron Swanson, oops… actor Nick Offerman.

Dan Harmon’s Circle

You know that movie with the guy who sees some pattern everywhere? Community‘s Dan Harmon is that guy. (via @glinner)

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At the New Republic, B. D. McClay writes about Shirley Jackson and a new collection containing previously unpublished stories and essays by Jackson. “Let Me Tell You, on the other hand, is for the already-converted fan, who will be delighted to read so many new stories and essays. The greatest attraction is the 15 essays, which touch on subjects as diverse as the travails of being married to a book critic (‘book reviewing is just nothing for a healthy young girl to be married to’), Samuel Richardson (‘no small action is consummated in less than ten pages’), poltergeist-bearing postcards (‘I think it is simply too much for any one house to have poltergeists and children’), and clowns.”

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    At Teleport City, the Gutter’s own Carol writes about 12 books that vary in reputability and their harrowing nature. They include books by Shirley Jackson, Raymond Chandler, Patricia Highsmith and Herman Melville.

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    Anne Billson has posted a 1985 interview she did with director George Miller (the Mad Max films). Miller talks about many things including Aunty Entity’s probable past as a hero and Max as, in Mel Gibson’s words, “a closet human being.” (Thanks, Matt!)

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    At New York Magazine, David Wallace-Wells writes about bees, colony collapse disorder and beekeeper Dave Hackenberg. “It’s been a long decade for bees. We’ve been panicking about them nonstop since 2006, when beekeeper Dave Hackenberg inspected 2,400 hives wintering in Florida and found 400 of them abandoned — totally empty. American beekeepers had experienced dramatic die-offs before, as recently as the previous winter in California and in regular bouts with a deadly bug called the varroa mite since the 1980s. But those die-offs would at least produce bodies pathologists could study. Here, the bees had just disappeared. In the U.K., they called it Mary Celeste syndrome, after the merchant ship discovered off the Azores in 1872 with not a single passenger aboard. The bees hadn’t even scrawled CROATOAN in honey on the door on their way out of the hive.”

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    Andrew Nette has a pair of interesting pieces on pulp you might be interested in. First, he writes about “the New Pulp” and a bit about Fifty Shades of Gray in “Fifty Shades of Pulp.” Then he writes about pulp and literacy and furthering social advancement in “Pulp and Circumstance.”  “Most people view pulp as either exploitative lowbrow culture or highly collectable retro artefact. Yet pulp has a secret history which Rabinowitz’s book uncovers. Her central thesis is that cheap, mass-produced pulp novels not only provided entertainment and cheap titillating thrills, but also brought modernism to the American people, democratising reading and, in the process, furthering culture and social enlightenment.”

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    The Projection Booth interviews actor Ed Asner.

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