The Cultural Gutter

unashamed geekery

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

“The Blight of the Honey Bee”

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At New York Magazine, David Wallace-Wells writes about bees, colony collapse disorder and beekeeper Dave Hackenberg. “It’s been a long decade for bees. We’ve been panicking about them nonstop since 2006, when beekeeper Dave Hackenberg inspected 2,400 hives wintering in Florida and found 400 of them abandoned — totally empty. American beekeepers had experienced dramatic […]

The Projection Booth Special Report: Ed Asner

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The Projection Booth interviews actor Ed Asner. Like this:Like Loading…

“Jeffrey Veregge: Art, Design, Mischief”

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A gallery of sweet geeky art from Native American artist, Jeffrey Veregge. “My origins are not supernatural, nor have they been enhanced by radioactive spiders. I am simply a Native American artist and writer whose creative mantra in best summed up with a word from my tribe’s own language as: ‘taʔčaʔx̣ʷéʔtəŋ,’ which means ‘get into […]

Summer Fun Time Reading ’15

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The Summer Solstice is nearly upon us, and I’m sure you all have your wicker men (or factionalist bee helmets) nearly done and your bonfire safely planned. (Remember, Lord Summerisle recommends nude leaping as the crucial component in bonfire safety). And just in time for the arrival of summer, I have a short selection of […]

“What Cersei Lannister’s Walk of Shame Tells Us About Our Culture”

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At Vice, Medievalist Kathleen E. Kennedy writes about the chastisement of Cersei Lannister in The Game Of Thrones and how it relates to Medieval European and contemporary shaming. (via @kalaity) Like this:Like Loading…

“On Object Permanence in the WWE”

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Calvin Kasulke explains the role of object permanence–or the lack thereof–among wrestlers in the WWE. Like this:Like Loading…

Interview with Lexi Alexander

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The Kernal interviews director Lexi Alexander about the film industry, the ACLU investigation of gender discrimination in Hollywood, the connection between file-sharing and gender equality, trying to get an Arab-led series on television and the problem with crowdfunding. Like this:Like Loading…

Entourage And The Slow-Burning Death Of The American Dream”

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At Bitter Empire, Kaleb Horton writes about Entourage: “This movie, with all the charm of a seasoned leisure class alcoholic, coldly and mechanically celebrates the degradation of humanity. It is a movie with no moral center. A movie with no worldview. A commercial for having a million dollars to kill on the Sunset Strip. It […]

“The Re-Masculinization of Cyborg”

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Comics Alliance‘s Andrew Wheeler writes about David F. Walker’s impending run on Cyborg and “the re-masculinization” of a Black male superhero. “At Emerald City Comic-Con earlier this year I was lucky enough to be on a panel on diversity and representation with David F. Walker, two months after his Cyborg title was announced. During the […]

“Pop Culture Happy Hour: The Romance Novel Special”

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Pop Culture Happy Hour invites Sarah Wendell, Barrie Hardymon and Petra Mayer  to discuss romance and romance novels. The podcast website includes a list of all the books recommended. And you can check out Sarah Wendell’s website, Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, here. (Thanks, @bethlovesbolly!) Like this:Like Loading…

“The Iceman List”

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“Here are just a few other classic movie antagonists who we root against not because they’re wrong per se, but mostly because they’re just not as likable as the characters who carry the movie. Let’s call it ‘The Iceman List.’” Read more of Tim Carmody’s “The Iceman List” here. Like this:Like Loading…

“Good-bye, David Letterman”

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Friend of the Gutter, Robert A. Mitchell writes a very moving piece about his father, growing up and The Late Show With David Letterman. “My father has been a long distance truck driver for over thirty-five years. His home is a sleeper bunk behind his steering wheel in some rest stop/parking lot/truck stop somewhere in […]

Not in my backyard

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“Not in my backyard” is a phrase that has acquired a bunch of negative connotations since it came into common usage in the 80s. NIMBYism usually means that there’s something you benefit from or rely on to maintain your lifestyle, but you don’t want anyone to build one near where you live. As in, “Please […]

Sticks and Bones

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There is a gallery of Patrick Dougherty’s woven “Stickwork” installations in Salem, MA at Odd Things I’ve Seen. In a similar vein, you can see some of Joshua Walsh’s art and design for True Detective season 1. Like this:Like Loading…

Wolves In The Speakeasy

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Speakeasy Radio hosted an tweetalong of The Company Of Wolves followed by a short podcast where Prof. Kate Laity, Ms. Angela Englert and the Gutter’s own Carol discuss the film, author Angela Carter and werewolves. Listen to the episode of Speakeasy Radio here and see all the tweets here. Like this:Like Loading…

“Nudie Cohn, Country Music Clothier”

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Dangerous Minds has a brief overview of Nudie Cohn’s life and work–including a gallery of some of his amazing designs for Hank Williams, Gram Parsons, Elvis and Keith Richards. “Nudie Cohn’s influence went way beyond country though. As he adapted with the 1960s counterculture, his work became even more subversive—the ‘pot, pills and poppies suit’ […]

“The Bitter Tears of the Private Detective”

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At Multiglom, Anne Billson writes about Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes and “The Bitter Tears of the Private Detective.” Last week I went to see Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes again. And once again, as I dabbed my eyes with a hanky, I was intrigued and beguiled by the […]

“The Crime of Blackness: Dorothy B. Hughes’ Forgotten Noir”

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Christine Smallwood writes about Dorothy  B. Hughes and her book, The Expendable Man, at The New Yorker. “It is not whodunit, but who-ness itself, that she’s after. By this I do not mean that she asks why—specific motives are as mulish and unanswerable as sin. Crime was never Hughes’s interest, evil was, and to be […]

On The Media: True Crime

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On The Media dedicates an hour to the true crime genre. Like this:Like Loading…

“Never Alone”

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At Bitch, Liza Dadoly writes about Never Alone. “Never Alone’s plot is based around Alaskan indigenous folklore, specifically the story ‘Kunuuksaayuka,’ a tale told by storyteller Robert Nasruk Cleveland of the Inupiaq people. ‘Kunuuksaayuka’ tells of a young boy who goes out into a blizzard to discover its source and, by doing so, save his […]

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  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At New York Magazine, David Wallace-Wells writes about bees, colony collapse disorder and beekeeper Dave Hackenberg. “It’s been a long decade for bees. We’ve been panicking about them nonstop since 2006, when beekeeper Dave Hackenberg inspected 2,400 hives wintering in Florida and found 400 of them abandoned — totally empty. American beekeepers had experienced dramatic die-offs before, as recently as the previous winter in California and in regular bouts with a deadly bug called the varroa mite since the 1980s. But those die-offs would at least produce bodies pathologists could study. Here, the bees had just disappeared. In the U.K., they called it Mary Celeste syndrome, after the merchant ship discovered off the Azores in 1872 with not a single passenger aboard. The bees hadn’t even scrawled CROATOAN in honey on the door on their way out of the hive.”

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    Andrew Nette has a pair of interesting pieces on pulp you might be interested in. First, he writes about “the New Pulp” and a bit about Fifty Shades of Gray in “Fifty Shades of Pulp.” Then he writes about pulp and literacy and furthering social advancement in “Pulp and Circumstance.”  “Most people view pulp as either exploitative lowbrow culture or highly collectable retro artefact. Yet pulp has a secret history which Rabinowitz’s book uncovers. Her central thesis is that cheap, mass-produced pulp novels not only provided entertainment and cheap titillating thrills, but also brought modernism to the American people, democratising reading and, in the process, furthering culture and social enlightenment.”

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    The Projection Booth interviews actor Ed Asner.

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    Transcript from BAFTA’s tribute to director Johnnie To, “Johnnie To: A Life In Pictures.” It’s a great interview with To about his films and process. “Like when I made The Mission I didn’t have a script. It was 1999 and I didn’t have any money so we went to Taiwan and they gave us very little money to hurry up and make a film, so without any script we just started making it. And after 19 days we made the film.” (Thanks to the Heroic Sisterhood!)

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    A gallery of sweet geeky art from Native American artist, Jeffrey Veregge. “My origins are not supernatural, nor have they been enhanced by radioactive spiders. I am simply a Native American artist and writer whose creative mantra in best summed up with a word from my tribe’s own language as: ‘taʔčaʔx̣ʷéʔtəŋ,’ which means ‘get into trouble.'”

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    John Reppion continues his series on English magic and Jonathan Strange And Mr. Norrell. Next up, “Away With The Fairies.”

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