The Cultural Gutter

the cult in your pop culture

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." -- Oscar Wilde

Steranko on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At The Hollywood Reporter, comics creator Jim Steranko watches Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. “So, let me ask you this question: If America were really under attack, would you actually want these SHIELD geeks calling the shots?”

Will Eisner Week!

GetDownGutter_Thumb

It’s Will Eisner Week and Sequart is celebrating with a week of Eisner-themed articles. You can find articles as they add them here.

A Profile of Archie Comics’s Creative Director Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The New York Times profiles Archie Comics’ new creative director, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Aguirre-Sacasa scripted both the recent Afterlife With Archie and the Archie/Glee crossover and he is also a screenwriter and playwright.

Fun! Charm! Thrilling Adventure!

AmeliaP

The Thrilling Adventure Hour is a beacon in a grittily realistic, grimdark pop culture landscape, one guiding lost souls to fun, charm and adventure. And I’m glad to see The Thrilling Adventure Hour adapted from podcast radio play into graphic novel because I like what it portends for fun stories in the future and because […]

Interview with Jeopardy! Winner Arthur Chu

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The AV Club has an interview with Jeopardy! Champion, Arthur Chu, in which he discusses strategizing to win the game show, public personas and how the show is made.  

RIP, Harold Ramis

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor, writer and director Harold Ramis has died. He is probably best known for  SCTV, Animal House, Meatballs, Stripes, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters II, and Groundhog Day. He also had memorable roles in As Good As It Gets and Knocked Up.  The Chicago Tribune, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. The […]

Becoming a Cipher to Oneself

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Jim C. Hines’ blog, writer Micha Trota writes about what it means when she says, “I don’t see race.” “It means that because I learned to see no difference between ‘white’ and ‘color,’ I have white-washed my own sense of self. It means that I know more about what it is to be a […]

“Space Ladies from Outer Space”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

The Gutter’s own Carol invaded The Infernal Brains podcast to discuss space ladies with Todd from Die, Danger, Die, Die, Kill! and Tars Tarkas from TarsTarkas.net.

Vic Armstrong on Buster Keaton

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Stunt performer Vic Armstrong talks about the stunt work of Buster Keaton. (via Graham Wynd)

Noir City XII Dispatches

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Odienator collects all of his dispatches from Noir City XII, San Francisco’s film noir festival, in one place and you can find them here.

“The LEGO Movie: Further Evidence of Will Ferrell’s Subversive Genius”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

“To be fair, I have no idea whether [Will Ferrell] had input into the script of The Lego Movie or not. But the mere fact that he was cast as the movie’s villain should have been a giveaway as to its ideology. For more than a decade now, Ferrell’s starred in big, dumb films of surprising political […]

RIP, Sid Caesar

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Comedian, actor and writer Sid Caesar has died. The New York Times and Variety have obituaries. Time has gathered clips of his work. The Archive of American Television has an interview with Caesar here.

RIP, Shirley Temple

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actress and Ambassador Shirley Temple Black has died. The New York Times and The Guardian have obituaries.  She got her start in “Baby Burlesks” went on to make many, many films, become the US Ambassador to the United Nations, Ghana and Czechoslovakia, the first female US Chief of Protocol, as well as an early activist for […]

“An Alternate History of Flappy Bird”

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At Radiator Design Blog, Robert Yang writes about the indie game Flappy Bird and the harassment of its designer, Dong Ngyuen. “I suspect that if Nguyen were a white American, this would’ve been the story of a scrappy indie who managed to best Zynga with his loving homage to Nintendo’s apparent patent on green pixel […]

True Detective’s Six-Minute Tracking Shot

GetDownGutter_Thumb

At MTV, Cary Fukunaga shares the story of his 6-minute long, single tracking shot in an episode of True Detective. “Having used the technique in both of his feature films, Sin Nombre and Jane Eyre, Fukunaga signed onto True Detective knowing that he wanted to include a long take at some point, because he considers […]

More News About Detroit’s Robocop Statue

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Metro Times has a nice report on Detroit’s Robocop statue.

Forty-One Black Women In Horror Writing

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Sumiko Saulson shares a list of twenty Black women in horror writing. “February is Black History Month here in the United States. It is also Women in Horror Month (WiHM). As an Ambassador for WiHM, and as a woman of color (I am Black and Jewish) who is a horror writer, I am poignantly aware […]

RIP, Philip Seymour Hoffman

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor and director Philip Seymour Hoffman has died. Hoffman performed in numerous films including, The Master, Capote, Magnolia, The Hunger Games, Mary and Max, and The Talented Mr. Ripley.  There are a collection of tributes at RogerEbert.com. The Dissolve‘s editors reflect on Hoffman’s work. At Monkey See, Linda Holmes writes about Hoffman and the blessings […]

RIP, Maximilian Schell

GetDownGutter_Thumb

Actor, director, producer and concert pianist Maximilian Schell has died. Schell received an Academy Award for his performance Judgment At Nuremberg. He also appeared in films ranging from The Odessa File and to The Black Hole John Carpenter’s Vampires. The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. Here is […]

RIP, Arthur Rankin, Jr.

Animator, director and producer Arthur Rankin, Jr. has died. Rankin is probably best known for his Rankin/Bass studio’s holiday television specials such as Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town and Mad Monster Party. He also produced and directed The Last Unicorn, The Hobbit (1977), The Return Of The King (1980), The […]

« go backkeep looking »
  • The Book!

  • Support The Gutter

  • Of Note Elsewhere

    At Salon, Matt Ashby and Brendan Carroll write about irony and cynicism, sincerity and honesty in art: “At one time, irony served to challenge the establishment; now it is the establishment. The art of irony has turned into ironic art. Irony for irony’s sake. A smart aleck making bomb noises in front of a city in ruins. But irony without a purpose enables cynicism. It stops at disavowal and destruction, fearing strong conviction is a mark of simplicity and delusion.

    ~

    Eastern Kicks has an interview–and a gallery of photos of–director Park Joon-hung.

    ~

    Get ready for a new season of Mad Men with this collection of Absurdist Mad Men promotions, which the Cultural Gutter participates in and even encourages. Duck Phillips rules an undersea advertizing empire and “Pete feels slighted.”

    ~

    Some interesting thoughts on South Korean cinema with “A Dish Best Served Bloody: Revenge In South Korean Cinema” and this Cannes program piece on Arirang (1926) and the history of Korean film.

    ~

    Al-Jazeera America profiles John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, a documentary about Cambodian rock’n'roll and musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge. “Until 1975, music thrived in Phnom Penh, with clubs full night after night, crowds gathering in the streets around transistor radios to hear the latest releases, and the biggest stars being feted by the king. Enter the Khmer Rouge, communism and the war on intellectuals. Between 1975 and 1979, about 2 million Cambodians, roughly a third of the population, were rounded up and either were killed or died of starvation. Artists were particularly disliked by the Khmer Rouge, which saw creativity as decadence: Almost all of the biggest names perished during that era.”

    ~

    Architecture Daily has an excerpt from City of Darkness detailing the development of Hong Kong’s Kowloon Walled City. “By the 1970s, the City had filled out to its maximised form, with buildings of up to 14 storeys in height, and virtually no ground level daylight penetration save at its centre. Its density was estimated to have reached a mere 7 square feet per person. The yamen area had somehow remained an exception to the vertical development, leased to a missionary society in 1949 for use as an almshouse and old people’s home. Eventually, it defined the sole substantial void within the Walled City, with visible sky above it.”

    ~

  • Spilling into Twitter

  • Obsessive?

    Then you might be interested in knowing you can subscribe to our RSS feed, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Tumblr.

    -------

  • Weekly Notifications

  • What We’re Talking About

  • Thanks To

    No Media Kings hosts this site, and Wordpress autoconstructs it.

  • %d bloggers like this: